CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

Friday, November 15, 2013

Philippines Typhoon linked to ‘Man-Made’ Microwave Pulses

 

 

 

Philippines Typhoon linked to ‘Man-Made’ Microwave Pulses

 

 

ENLARGE THIS VIDEO TO UNDERSTAND FURTHER

 

A prolific weather-watcher known as ‘Dutchsinse’ has linked the latest storm formations in the Philippines to man-made microwave pulses using HAARP technology, including Typhoon Haiyan
In recent years, weather modification has been forced into the spotlight by many independent investigators as well those from scientific fields, including admissions by well-known personalities in science. One such scientist who has acknowledged that this technology exists is theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku…
The world has seen many anomalies in weather patterns increase in the recent past, such as Hurricane’s Sandy and Katrina,
both are said to have been controlled, hovering over land masses via modification.

 

On the Weather Modification Association’s own website, they admit such programs have existed for over 60 years in conjunction with other agencies:
The Weather Modification Association (WMA) was organized in 1950 to cultivate a better understanding of weather modification techniques, impacts, and expectations among program sponsors, program operators, and the scientific community, and to promote ethical professional conduct and a free exchange of information.”
Government installations are already conducting ‘atmospheric heating experiments’ around the globe, including operational centers and radar observation stations in the immediate vicinity of what has been dubbed this week as “the world’s largest ever storm”.
Weather-watcher, Dutchsine, discovers data relating to microwave pulse activity linked to this most recent Typhoon Haiyan (named “Typhoon Yolanda” in the Philippines) event in South East Asia. He also suggests that the storm system known “Zoraida” is also a man-made microwave directed storm.
Watch the video below…

 

Majestic Super Typhoon LEKIMA. SW-IR satellite image recorded at 14:30UTC on October 24, 2013. Temperature of the patch located to the right of the typhoon’s eye measures about 150ºK (< minus 123ºC) making it the coldest place on or near planet Earth. Image sourced from: CIMSS/SSEC/WISC.

Majestic Super Typhoon LEKIMA. SW-IR satellite image recorded at 14:30UTC on October 24, 2013. Temperature of the patch located to the right of the typhoon’s eye measures about 150ºK (< minus 123ºC) making it the coldest place on or near planet Earth. Image sourced from: CIMSS/SSEC/WISC.

Mysterious Energy Pulse Threatens Typhoon “Business”

By Gordon Duff, Senior Editor

This week, one typhoon and one tropical storm simply vanished while heading toward Japan.  They were abruptly turned northward, sparing Japan and then simply vanished.

The MSM has responded with a news blackout.  There are no explanations.

 

Days before, the events were predicted in an article on Veterans Today, citing plans by a defense group to use a Tesla based energy system to disrupt the storms.

The website announced in advance when they were beginning operations and reported results as things transpired.

As to whether they were successful or that the two storms mysteriously disappeared, a freak of nature, will never be proven.

The group announced they are willing and able to cause another mysterious freak of nature when needed.

Weather Modification Tech Tested on Japan

Chem-trails detected in attempt to restore typhoon.  I have never written on Chem-trails or HAARP.  As VT has become, perhaps, the major player in global information we have begun applying higher standards than the MSM does.  However, we have solid information that this typhoon is NOT natural and that efforts are being made to use it against Japan.

We stuck our necks out on this, letting the public know about efforts to dissipate the storm using highly classified tech.  We are now seeing “pushback” from someone.  The map below outlines the attack, where Chem-trails have been laid and how they are helping re-form the storm:

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(Earlier today) Latest: The operation still in process in spite of countermeasures

  • region north of top arm dissipating

  • +3 hours, region north of eye reduced asymmetically

  • +2 hours, complete loss of symmetry

  • 13 hours into op, storm reduced to category 3

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By Gordon Duff, Senior Editor

SUPER TYPHOON LEKIMA 24 OCTOBER 2013

Commencement 75% employement at 12:52 pm, 19:52 GMT

(Late Yesterday) Project graphics below:

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Technology tested in the US over the last few years, a breakoff team from DARPA, will be testing its Tesla based technology on the typhoons currently threatening Japan.  At best, damage and landfall will be limited.

Hopes are that the storm can be broken up in under 48 hours.  We will see.

VT knows those involved.  We wish them luck.

Look for anomalous behavior of these storms that, over the next few hours, will be the subject of high energy experiments that had proven very successful on a smaller scale in the US.

Big typhoons may collide off Honshu

ScreenHunter_2417 Oct. 24 13.37

by Tomohiro Osaki

Less than a week after being hit by the largest typhoon in a decade, Tokyo is bracing for another strong storm that will likely reach the area Saturday, and it may get merged with an even stronger approaching tempest.Though less powerful than Typhoon Wipha, incoming tropical cyclone Francisco is rated as “strong,” the Meteorological Agency said. But on a possible collision course is Typhoon Lekima, considered “more fierce.”As of 3 p.m. Wednesday, Typhoon Francisco, the 27th this year, was located about 180 km south of Minamidaito Island, east of Okinawa, heading northwest at a speed of 15 kph.The agency previously described the typhoon as “very strong,” but it appears to have passed its peak, weather forecaster Nobuaki Hiramatsu said.Still, Hiramatsu cautioned that the relatively slow speed of Francisco heralds prolonged rainfall. The possibility remains, he added, that it could lead to the same amount of rain as Wipha brought to Tokyo last weekend.It has so far proved a daunting task to predict the course of Francisco, Hiramatsu said, partly because the “more fierce” Lekima, the year’s 28th typhoon, may affect its path.

“If it wasn’t for Lekima, Francisco would just go away up north,” he said. But the stronger and faster Lekima is likely to block and even disrupt Francisco, preventing its swift run to the north and altering its path.

The Meteorological Agency said the two storms will likely come in closest proximity to each other Saturday, when Francisco is forecast to linger over the Izu island chain south of Tokyo, unable to move due to the stronger force of Lekima just to its east.

This interaction between two typhoons in close proximity is popularly known as the “Fujiwara Effect,” named after the late meteorologist Sakuhei Fujiwara.

Among the Izu islets is Oshima, which Wipha pounded last week, leaving 29 residents confirmed dead and 15 missing as of Wednesday morning.

Hiramatsu warned that torrential rain could once again pelt Izu-Oshima, leading to a repeat of the mud and landslides that caused so much devastation there.

In preparation for the onslaught of another disastrous typhoon, The local government is gearing up to evacuate 119 people, including elderly and disabled residents, and their families and helpers. Starting Wednesday, the evacuation was to continue through Thursday. The municipality was also canvassing neighborhoods to see how many more residents, especially pregnant women and bedridden people, want to flee the island.

As the two typhoons approached Honshu, concerns were mounting over the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. Tokyo Electric Power Co. drew fire Sunday for failing to prevent rainwater brought by Wipha from overflowing concrete walls enclosing tanks containing radioactive water. At one monitoring point, the spilled rainwater was found to contain strontium-90 at a level of 710 becquerels per liter, 71 times higher than Tepco’s self-imposed limit.

To prevent the same blunder, Tepco on Tuesday began to install tanks with extra pipes to boost their ability to pump out water and transfer it somewhere safer, and added manpower. It will also mobilize a larger number of workers to monitor the situation and carry out the pumping operation more smoothly, according to Tepco spokesman Hiroki Kasuya.

“We’re coming up with various preventative measures, and all we can say is that we will do everything we can to ensure the plant’s safety,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's now one week after Super Typhoon Haiyan made landfall, wreaking unprecedented damage and killing thousands. The islands of Leyte and Samar were hardest hit, with entire cities and towns reduced to rubble and debris. The past week was a desperate one for survivors as they struggled to find food, clean water, shelter, and security. Widespread destruction left roads impassable, electricity cut, government services in a shambles, and 600,0000 homeless. International aid is only now starting to arrive in significant amounts, and bodies are still being discovered among the debris.

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan react as a U.S. Marine Corps Osprey aircraft takes off after delivering relief goods in Guiuan, Philippines, on November 14, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and displacing hundreds of thousands of people.(AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

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Typhoon Haiyan survivors ride motorbikes through the ruins of the destroyed town of Guiuan, Philippines on November 14, 2013. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder) #

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An aerial view of a demolished house on an island near Eastern Samar Island on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines.(Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) #

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An aerial view shows the destruction left from Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal town of Tanawan, central Philippines, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Wally Santana) #

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A super typhoon Haiyan survivor poses with her name displayed on a tablet in Samar province, on November 11, 2013. Photographer John Javellana was asked by several groups of Haiyan survivors to post their photos on social media sites identifying some of those who made it through the storm which swept through the central Philippines so that loved ones know they are alive. (Reuters/John Javellana) #

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Residents walk past scenes of devastation in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, on November 13, 2013.(Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) #

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Covered bodies of typhoon victims are left in front of a damaged house in the village area of Tacloban, on November 13, 2013, five days after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the area. Desperation gripped Philippine islands devastated by Typhoon Haiyan as looting turned deadly on Wednesday and survivors panicked over delays in supplies of food, water and medicine, some digging up underground water pipes and smashing them open. (Reuters/Bobby Yip) #

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One of the statues of the team of U.S. General Douglas MacArthur reeanacting his historic landing lies face down in the water after falling at the height of super typhoon Haiyan in Palo, Leyte province, on November 12, 2013.(Reuters/Erik De Castro) #

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A man walks past unclaimed bodies on the beach in Tacloban city, on November 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez) #

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Members of the fire department retrieve bodies from the rubble in Tacloban City, on November 14, 2013.(Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images) #

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Dead bodies are lined up at a makeshift morgue in Tacloban, on November 12, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. (Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Filipino firemen unload body bags at a mass burial site in the typhoon-hit city of Tacloban, on November 14, 2013.(AP Photo/Aaron Favila) #

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Young volunteers carry a corpse of a victim of Typhoon Haiyan during a mass burial on the outskirts of Tacloban, on November 14, 2013. Scores of decaying bodies were laid in mass graves on November 14 as overwhelmed Philippines authorities grappled with disposal of the dead, while the living begged for help after the typhoon disaster.(Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Filipino workers arrange body bags at a mass burial site at the Basper public cemetery in Tacloban, on November 14, 2013.(AP Photo/Aaron Favila) #

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Policemen and volunteers carry body bags to a mass grave for burial in the aftermath of super typhoon Haiyan, on November 14, 2013. (Reuters/Edgar Su) #

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A statue stands among the debris of the city's university in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte, on November 14, 2013. An image of this same scene, photographed in 2008, can be viewed here. (Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A young girl walks her brother to the Tacloban City Convention Center known as the Astrodome, on November 14, 2013, where hundreds of displaced typhoon survivors have set up makeshift shelters throughout the complex's once bustling shops and popular basketball court. For the thousands of people jamming the Tacloban City Astrodome, the great halls with a solid roof was a heaven-sent refuge when Typhoon Haiyan rammed eastern Philippines. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) #

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A woman helps her daughter dry herself after she took a bath inside the Tacloban City Convention Centre, also known as the "Astrodome", where she and her family are temporarily staying, on November 14, 2013. (Reuters/Bobby Yip) #

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A wrecked van lies amid felled trees in Tacloban City on November 14, 2013 in Tacloban. Countries all over the world have pledged relief aid to help support those affected by the typhoon however damage to the airport and roads have made moving the aid into the most affected areas very difficult. With dead bodies left out in the open air and very limited food, water and shelter, health concerns are growing. (Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images) #

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An aerial photo shows oil spilled around a government-owned National Power Corporation (NAPOCOR) power barge after it ran aground when super typhoon Haiyan hit Estancia town, north of Iloilo, central Philippines, on November 14, 2013.(Reuters/Leo Solinap) #

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An oil spill, resulting from of a government-owned National Power Corporation (NAPOCOR) power barge running aground when super typhoon Haiyan hit Estancia town, on November 14, 2013. (Reuters/Leo Solinap) #

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U.S. troops drop relief supplies for typhoon survivors in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 14, 2013 in Tacloban. (Jeoffrey Maitem/Getty Images) #

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Survivors wait for aid and relief from the Philippines military along the coast affected by Typhoon Haiyan, on November 14, 2013 in Hernani, eastern Samar, central Philippines. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) #

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A typhoon victim cries as she boards a Philippines C130 army cargo plane, as she and others are evacuated at Tacloban airport, on November 14, 2013. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images) #

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The Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) sits off the coast of the Philippines in a July 1, 2012 photo. The USNS Mercy was activated November 13, 2013 to be ready to support disaster relief efforts in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. (Reuters/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Feddersen/U.S. Navy) #

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A woman is evacuated from the airport in Tacloban, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) #

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A woman washes amid scenes of devastation in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 13, 2013 in Tacloban.(Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) #

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Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk through the ruins of their neighborhood on the outskirts of Tacloban, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder) #

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Typhoon Haiyan survivors wait on a roadside in the destroyed town of Guiuan, Philippines, on November 14, 2013.(AP Photo/David Guttenfelder) #

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An aerial view of a boat washed up ashore on the demolished coastal town of Eastern Samar Island on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) #

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A woman rests on a roadside with her family's belongings near the typhoon-ravaged town of Tacloban, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder) #

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A girl waits to board a rescue flight at the Tacloban Airport, on November 14, 2013. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) #

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Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan react as a U.S. Marine Corps Osprey aircraft prepares to land to deliver relief goods in Guiuan, Philippines, on November 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara) #

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A young Filipino girl smiles as she and her brother receive their first bag of food aid at a center in Tacloban in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 14, 2013. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) #

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Ships lie next to destroyed houses after being swept ashore at the height of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban city, on November 14, 2013. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images) #

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An aerial view of a demolished coastal town on Eastern Samar Island on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines.(Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) #

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Survivors build temporary shelter in typhoon-ravaged Tacloban city, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) #

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A boy holds a rooster as he and his family members who are affected by Typhoon Haiyan wait for his bus to leave the city in Tacloban, on November 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara) #

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Typhoon-damaged fuel tanks along the coast in Tanawan, central Philippines, on November 13, 2013.(AP Photo/Wally Santana) #

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A man takes a shower amid rubble in an area badly affected by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, on November 13, 2013.(AP Photo/Dita Alangkara) #

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A homemade casket sits on the side of the road as curfew approaches on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan which ripped through Philippines last week has been described as one of the most powerful typhoons ever to hit land, leaving thousands dead and hundreds of thousands homeless. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images) #

 

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