CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

Monday, December 5, 2016

Unseen photos of Hitler’s Executed in Laws




Ominous rites: Annual midnight swearing-in of SS-men in Feldherrnhalle. Short for  Schutzstaffel, the SS was the powerful military police arm of the Third Reich which numbered some 50,000 at its largest

Relics of Hitler’s Era

 

 

 

 

 

Left to rot: The abandoned Hitler Youth training school,

NAZIS




Rarely seen color photographs of the Third Reich by Der Fuhrer's own beloved personal photographer Hugo Jaeger give a startling glimpse into the larger than life celebrations from Hitler's heinous reign.
Jaeger collected took nearly 2,000 as he traveled with the loathed dictator during the late 1930s and 40s.
Hitler loved the photographer's work and even commented on first seeing Jaeger's photos: 'The future belongs to color photography.'
Thankfully, the future did not belong to Hitler. Though, the prints survive because Jaeger successfully buried his film, as the Americans closed in at the end of the war, for fear his friendship with Hitler would get him arrested.
Jaeger remained free and by the 1970s he'd been able to retrieve all his film along with their simultaneously brilliant and revolting content. He sold the prints to LIFE, who wrote of Jaeger's upon the publication of his work: 'We do not usually give so much space to the work of men we admire so little.'
Startling loyalty: League of German Girls Dancing during the Reichs Party Congress. The group was the girls branch of Hitler's youth, into which girls were initiated through peer pressure and propaganda at the age of 14
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Startling loyalty: League of German Girls Dancing during the Reichs Party Congress. The group was the girls branch of Hitler's youth, into which girls were initiated through peer pressure and propaganda at the age of 14. Up until 1936, membership in the group was optional but became compulsory that year
Massive crowds: Nazi leader Adolf Hitler saluting leaders and men of the Legion Condor, troops of the German Luftwaffe, an airborne wing of the military Hitler founded despite the Treaty of Versailles stipulation that Germany could have no such force
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Massive crowds: Nazi leader Adolf Hitler saluting leaders and men of the Legion Condor, troops of the German Luftwaffe, an airborne wing of the military Hitler founded despite the Treaty of Versailles stipulation that Germany could have no such force
Terrifying imagery: Propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels speaking at the Lustgarden in Berlin. The master of mass psychology helped Hitler mold Germany into a nation bent on resisting the Allied forces
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Terrifying imagery: Propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels speaking at the Lustgarden in Berlin. The master of mass psychology helped Hitler mold Germany into a nation bent on resisting the Allied forces
Art of power: Here, Hitler and Goebbels are seen in the Charlottenburg Theater's honor box as everyone salutes. A failed playwright himself Goebbels saw to it that no Jewish writers practiced their craft under Hitler's reign
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Art of power: Here, Hitler and Goebbels are seen in the Charlottenburg Theater's honor box as everyone salutes. A failed playwright himself Goebbels saw to it that no Jewish writers practiced their craft under Hitler's reign
Fierce loyalty: Crowds cheer Hitler's Austrian election campaign.In 1938, Hitler--who'd always seen Austria as a part of German--annexed the smaller country into greater Germany
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Fierce loyalty: Crowds cheer Hitler's Austrian election campaign.In 1938, Hitler--who'd always seen Austria as a part of German--annexed the smaller country into greater Germany
 
Ominous rites: Annual midnight swearing-in of SS-men in Feldherrnhalle. Short for  Schutzstaffel, the SS was the powerful military police arm of the Third Reich which numbered some 50,000 at its largest
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Ominous rites: Annual midnight swearing-in of SS-men in Feldherrnhalle. Short for Schutzstaffel, the SS was the powerful military police arm of the Third Reich which numbered some 50,000 at its largest
United in hate: Annual midnight swearing-in of SS recruits. The SS was basically Hitler's personal Army who, led by Heinrich Himmler, followed his orders alone
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United in hate: Annual midnight swearing-in of SS recruits. The SS was basically Hitler's personal Army who, led by Heinrich Himmler, followed his orders alone
Dangerous sport: Hitler Youth seen here at the Reichs' Party Congress in Nuremburg showing off their physical prowess.
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Dangerous sport: Hitler Youth seen here at the Reichs' Party Congress in Nuremburg showing off their physical prowess. While the young men of the Hitler Youth could enjoy games and sports with fellow boys, they were also indoctrinated into the Nazi beliefs via the group and its activities
'The Peoples Car'
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'The Peoples Car': A thrilled crowd salutes Hitler and other Nazi officials along roadway to the Fallersleben Volkswagen Works cornerstone ceremony. The Volkswagen, long before its brief American popularity in the 1960s, came out of the struggle to create a cheap German car of the 20s and 30s
Hate Bug: At the 1939 Fallersleben Volkswagen Works cornerstone laying ceremony, Hitler praised the Beetle and used it as part of his nationalist propaganda
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At the 1939 Fallersleben Volkswagen Works cornerstone laying ceremony, Hitler praised the Beetle and used it as part of his nationalist propaganda
Storm troops: Nazi Brown Shirts, soldiers from Germany's  Sturmabteilung or SA
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Storm troops: Nazi Brown Shirts, soldiers from Germany's Sturmabteilung or SA. This was the Third Reich's storm division whose terrifyingly violent and ruthless methods helped pave the way to power for Hitler after he founded the group in 1921

A previously unseen photo has emerged showing Adolf Hitler celebrating the wedding of his future 'brother-in-law' - who he had executed a year later.
The picture, taken just three days before D-Day, shows the Nazi dictator congratulating SS officer Hermann Fegelein and bride Gretl Braun at a reception in Salzburg, Austria. 
Just 11 months later, Hitler ordered the execution of the groom for the crime of deserting his post during the Allied invasion of Europe.
Scroll down for video 
A previously unseen photo has emerged showing Adolf Hitler (right) celebrating the wedding of his future brother-in-law SS officer Hermann Fegelein (left) to bride Gretl Braun (centre). Hitler had Fegelein executed a year later
A previously unseen photo has emerged showing Adolf Hitler (right) celebrating the wedding of his future brother-in-law SS officer Hermann Fegelein (left) to bride Gretl Braun (centre). Hitler had Fegelein executed a year later
Pictures taken just three days before D-Day also show Eva Braun (centre) being serenaded by Nazi musicians
Pictures taken just three days before D-Day also show Eva Braun (centre) being serenaded by Nazi musicians
Celebration: Gretl Braun is pictured, right, leaning back on new husband Hermann Fegelein on their wedding day
Celebration: Gretl Braun is pictured, right, leaning back on new husband Hermann Fegelein on their wedding day
The photo was found in an album of 12 black and white snaps of the wedding reception that lasted for three days and was organised by Eva Braun, the elder sister of Gretl and Hitler’s mistress. Many high ranking Nazi's were in attendance
The photo was found in an album of 12 black and white snaps of the wedding reception that lasted for three days and was organised by Eva Braun, the elder sister of Gretl and Hitler's mistress. Many high ranking Nazi's were in attendance
The photo was found in an album of 12 black and white snaps of the wedding reception that lasted for three days and was organised by Eva Braun, the elder sister of Gretl and Hitler's mistress.
The fuhrer was one of the witnesses to the marriage along with SS chief Heinrich Himmler and Martin Bormann, Hitler's private secretary.

Chilling footage shows Adolf Hitler taking power as German Chancellor 80 years on
The photos show the wedding guests enjoying themselves at the Mirabell Palace in Salzburg with lots of dancing, champagne and live music.
Three days later Hitler was fast asleep at his nearby Berghof residence when the Allied invasion of Europe began.
As tens of thousands of British, American and Canadian troops landed on the beaches of Normandy at 6am on June 6, Hitler's staff were too afraid to wake him to inform him.
The photos show the wedding guests enjoying themselves at the Mirabell Palace in Salzburg with lots of dancing, champagne drinking and live music
The photos show the wedding guests enjoying themselves at the Mirabell Palace in Salzburg with lots of dancing, champagne drinking and live music
Three days after the wedding, Hitler was fast asleep at his nearby Berghof residence when the Allied invasion of Europe began
Three days after the wedding, Hitler was fast asleep at his nearby Berghof residence when the Allied invasion of Europe began
The 12 black and white photos taken at her first wedding have sold at Marlows auctioneers of Stafford for £400
The 12 black and white photos taken at her first wedding have sold at Marlows auctioneers of Stafford for £400
Family affair: Sisters Gretl Braun (left) and Eva (right) were pictured embracing at the wedding ceremony
Family affair: Sisters Gretl Braun (left) and Eva (right) were pictured embracing at the wedding ceremony
This delayed the German response and counter-attack and allowed the Allies to gain a foothold on Nazi-occupied Europe. 
Eleven months later, in January 1945, and with defeat for Germany only a matter of time, Hitler had retreated to his Führerbunker in Berlin. By April of that year, Russian tanks had reached the outskirts of the city.
With battle raging in Berlin, Fegelein, who was also in the bunker, fled after reportedly deciding not to join a suicide pact - but was tracked down and arrested by Hitler's elite security force.
He had gone to his Berlin apartment and was in civilian clothes preparing to run away to Sweden or Switzerland and after being dragged back to the bunker, he was subjected to a court martial for desertion.
Eva Braun is said to have begged Hitler to spare Fegelein's life with his wife, Gretl, heavily pregnant.
Although there are conflicting reports of what happened next, it is thought he was taken to the garden of Berlin's Reich Chancellery on April 28 and shot.
Gretl (pictured being serenaded by Nazi musicians) was heavily pregnant when Hitler ordered the execution of her husband
Gretl (pictured being serenaded by Nazi musicians) was heavily pregnant when Hitler ordered the execution of her husband
The rare set of photos show Gretl Braun receiving wedding gifts at her reception in Austria. High ranking Nazi officials were invited
The rare set of photos show Gretl Braun receiving wedding gifts at her reception in Austria. High ranking Nazi officials were invited
The ceremony took place at a hall in Salzburg, Austria, close to Hitler's Berghof residence
The ceremony took place at a hall in Salzburg, Austria, close to Hitler's Berghof residence
A day later, Eva and Hitler married and on April 30 they both committed suicide; Eva by taking cyanide and Hitler by shooting himself.
Five days later Gretl gave birth to a daughter, Eva, who she named after her sister. Eva killed herself in 1971 following the death of her boyfriend in a car accident.
Gretl married a textile distributer in 1954 and lived in Bavaria until 1987.




























Chilling archive of the teenage Nazi: Camping gear emblazoned with the Swastika, a six-inch dagger and a diary that reveals Hitler Youth member’s infatuation with the Fuhrer

  • The Hitler Youth was used to train young Nazis for the army
  • A chilling archive from a member is going up for auction in Britain
  • It includes photos of youngsters who went on to die for the Third Reich


A chilling archive belonging to an enthusiastic member of the Hitler Youth has emerged to highlight how the Nazis brainwashed youngsters.
Teenager Helmut Nieboy kept detailed diaries, records and maps during his time with the German equivalent of the Boy Scouts from 1933.
He also amassed a number of photographs showing youngsters who went on to fight and die for the Third Reich, sitting around a campfire, marching and at rallies.
Helmut Nieboy - full of Nazi zeal Nieboy signed off Heil Hitler in his diaries

Nazi zeal: Helmut Nieboy (left) during his time in the Hitler Youth, while the picture on the right shows how he signed off his diary entries with 'Heil Hitler'
Helmut Nieboy's 'KamaradSchaft Florian Geyer' Hitler Youth company on parade
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Helmut Nieboy's 'KamaradSchaft Florian Geyer' Hitler Youth company on parade
He kept his Swastika-emblazoned tent and trumpet and his sinister 6ins bladed dagger, a far cry from a simple penknife the British Boy Scouts would have used. The diaries include incredibly detailed maps showing route marches the young members were sent on as well as hand drawn portraits of the Fuhrer with patriotic slogans.
The journals also contain lists of fellow members and those who failed to graduate, their ultimate fate left ominously unrecorded with a single red line through their name.
Up for sale: A Hitler Youth dagger with swastika on the handle and a portrait of Hitler with slogans in the diaries
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Up for sale: A Hitler Youth dagger with swastika on the handle and a portrait of Hitler with slogans in the diaries
Nieboy's dagger is a far cry from a simple penknife the British Boy Scouts would have used
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Nieboy's dagger is a far cry from a simple penknife the British Boy Scouts would have used
Helmut Nieboy's Hitler Youth bugle, which will also be sold at the auction at Mullock's of Shropshire
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Helmut Nieboy's Hitler Youth bugle, which will also be sold at the auction at Mullock's of Shropshire
The records are written in Helmut's neat handwriting and his fanaticism is clear, on one page he takes great care to write 'Heil Hitler'.
Helmut was one of 2.3million members of the Hitler Youth in 1933.
The paramilitary organisation was for boys aged 14 to 18 who were brainwashed into being part of Hitler's twisted idyll to build an Aryan super-race.
Members went on to become soldiers for the German military machine, with skilled fighters joining the Waffen SS.
A member of the Hitler Youth pictured blowing a bugle
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A member of the Hitler Youth pictured blowing a bugle
Brainwashed: Helmut Nieboy's Kamaradschaft on manouveres
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Brainwashed: Helmut Nieboy's Kamaradschaft on manouveres
Vetting: Helmut Nieboy's 'KamaradSchaft Florian Geyer' Hitler Youth company with lines through those children seen as not suitable for the group
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Vetting: Helmut Nieboy's 'KamaradSchaft Florian Geyer' Hitler Youth company with lines through those children seen as not suitable for the group
During the war, the young members were drafted into the German Home Guard and then acted as the last line of the defence of Berlin in 1945.
After the war most Hitler Youth members were keen to hide their affiliation and so archives such as Helmut's are rare today.
His was recently unearthed in Germany but is now being sold at auction at Mullock's of Ludlow, Shropshire, with a pre-sale estimate of £4,000.
'Day of Work' Rally in Berlin with Hitler parading Nieboy's incredibly detailed map of a march to Berlin
Devoted to the cause: A diary entry about a 'Day of Work' Rally in Berlin with Hitler parading (left), while on the right is a detailed map of a Hitler Youth march to the capital
Round the camp fire: Nieboy's Youth company on a march in the early 1930s
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Round the camp fire: Nieboy's Youth company on a march in the early 1930s
Speech: Nieboy's company were at this Hitler Youth Rally in front of the Fuhrer in 1935
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Speech: Nieboy's company were at this Hitler Youth Rally in front of the Fuhrer in 1935
Richard Westwood-Brookes, from Mullock's, said: ‘This is a rare archive of material relating to the Hitler Youth.
‘The organisation was Third Reich's way of developing young men for their armed forces.
‘It was their equivalent of the Boy Scout movement and they did similar things but with an emphasis on Nazi ideology.
‘This archive is particularly interesting because of the detailed diaries kept in three volumes, the maps, photographs but also his possessions.
Training: The Hitler Youth was the Third Reich's way of developing young men for their armed forces
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Training: The Hitler Youth was the Third Reich's way of developing young men for their armed forces
‘His tent, knife and trumpet are all among the collection that has remarkably stayed together.
‘Most similar archives would have been destroyed following the war as most people would want to erase evidence of their being in the Hitler Youth.
‘This youth was clearly committed and with his neat diaries and organisational skills I expect he had enjoyed promotion to the armed services by the time the war began.
‘Sadly, there is nothing to say what happened to Helmut.’
Also in the archive is a book of minutes and reports of the meetings of Helmut's group, notes of marching songs the boys sang and political discussions.
It also includes diplomas for his prowess in sport and an account of his attendance at one of the Nuremberg rallies.







































From buildings built by the Nazis to ornate theatres, burnt out hotels and eerie sanatoriums, these are the abandoned buildings that still litter the powerhouse of Europe.
Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled to the German capital Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film.
Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves.
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Former Hitler Youth Training School) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
An abandoned former Hitler Youth Training School pictured by British photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: The Eagle and Iron Cross mural - Krampnitz Kaserne) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
The Eagle and Iron Cross mural at Krampnitz Kaserne, a military complex, in Fahrland, Potsdam, created by the Germans during the rearmament period
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Warped parquet flooring - Krampnitz Kaserne) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Warped parquet flooring at Krampnitz Kaserne. The site was also used as a driving training centre until the Russians took control of the area, taking over a day after the Germans abandoned it April 26, 1945
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Gym-basketball court - Krampnitz Kaserne) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
A gym/basketball court at Krampnitz Kaserne. The 35th Guards Motor Rifle Division was then stationed there until its abandonment in 1992, after the Soviet Union dissolved
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Lecture hall - Former Hitler Youth training school) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Decaying: A lecture hall at the former Hitler Youth training school pictured by Daniel Barter, 30
A view of the former Hitler Youth training school's lecture hall from the stage
A view of the former Hitler Youth training school's lecture hall from the stage
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Former Hitler Youth Training School) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
The inside of the former Hitler Youth Training School in Germany. The windows are open, but this room is still in good condition
German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years.
Mr Barter said: 'I stumbled into photography via my degree, which was in restoration. My interest in abandonments started really young.
'When I was five my junior school had a derelict aeroplane in an adjoining field. Two of my friends and I climbed over the 10ft green wire mesh fence and entered the plane.
'If I close my eyes I can still picture the switches, dials and smell the leather. 'I find abandoned buildings to photograph by word of mouth or a little bit of research.
'To gain access to some of the locations is quite another story and can involve a lot of climbing, sneaking and hiding.
'The best and most interesting thing about photographing abandoned buildings in Germany has to be the clash between different opposing ideologies that dominated this region in the mid to late 20th century.
'There is almost nothing else similar to it around the globe.
'The way it effected the material fabric of these lost places and the way it continues to effect the region as a whole, is I believe unique.'
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Lung sanatorium) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
There are more than 60 buildings at the sanatorium which are looking for a new lease of life
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Guest room - Burnt out Hotel) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
An undamaged guest room in the burnt out hotel looks almost lived in, but very dated
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Main dining table - Burnt out hotel) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Seen better days: The main dining table in the abandoned and burnt out hotel
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Barbers chair-Manor house that once acted as a sanatorium) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Left to rot: A barber's chair in a manor house that once acted as a sanatorium
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Stairs - Lung Sanatorium) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
The grand staircase at the Lung Sanatorium that has been daubed with graffiti. The site is south of Berlin. Building work started in 1898
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Theatre) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Pictured here is an abandoned theatre that has not seen a show for years
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Theatre) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
Mr Barter's photographs show even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Burnt out hotel restaurant) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
A restaurant in the site of a burnt out hotel where food hasn't been on the menu for years
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Corridor - Lung Sanatorium) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
A corridor at the sanatorium. In its time it was also used as a hospital by the Russian Army until German reunification
PIC BY DANIEL BARTER / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Corridor - Lung Sanatorium) - Even the powerhouse of Europe has its fair share of abandoned properties and empty shop fronts as seen in these captivating pictures of decaying buildings Germany. Photographer Daniel Barter, 30, from London travelled Berlin and the surrounding countryside to capture buildings in need of work on film. Far from being resplendent in vintage glory, the deserted music venues and crumbling hospitals are a shadow of their former selves. German eagle motifs flake off ceilings and concert halls designed for hundreds have not seen a show for years. SEE CATERS COPY.
The arches around a courtyard inside the old sanatorium daubed with graffiti





























 
 
 
 
The first U.S. film to warn about the dangers of Adolf Hitler's Nazi regime has been found in a Brussels film archive, having lain unnoticed for some 75 years.
'Hitler's Reign of Terror' was produced by Cornelius Vanderbilt, an heir to the wealthy American industrialist family, who visited Germany as Hitler was voted into power in 1933.
The film revolves around footage that Vanderbilt shot and smuggled out, showing Nazi party rallies, book-burnings and the ransacking of Jewish shops.
Last copy: Bruno Mestdagh, the head of the digital collection at the Belgian cinema library, looks at footage of the recently-discovered 1934 U.S. anti-Nazi film, 'Hitler's Reign of Terror' which was directed by Cornelius Vanderbilt
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Last copy: Bruno Mestdagh, the head of the digital collection at the Belgian cinema library, looks at footage of the recently-discovered 1934 U.S. anti-Nazi film, 'Hitler's Reign of Terror' which was directed by Cornelius Vanderbilt
Cinematic treasure: The film as well-received when it premiered in New York, but thanks to a complaint by the German Embassy it was heavily censored for subsequent showings
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Cinematic treasure: The film as well-received when it premiered in New York, but thanks to a complaint by the German Embassy it was heavily censored for subsequent showings
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Cinematic treasure: The film as well-received when it premiered in New York, but thanks to a complaint by the German Embassy it was heavily censored for subsequent showings. The discovered copy was probably ordered by someone who wanted to show it in Belgium, but never collected it
At its premiere in New York in 1934, the film was a big success, said Bruno Mestdagh, head of the digital collections at the Belgian film archive Cinematheque.
'The German embassy in the United States protested, so the film was censored and adapted. It was then shown in other cities but with much less success,' Mestdagh said.
The version uncovered by the archive was most likely ordered by someone who wanted to show it in Belgium but never collected it, so the reel survived the war, and Nazi occupation, in the Belgian customs office.
Directed by: The film was produced by American journalist and railroad heir Cornelius Vanderbilt IV, above
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Directed by: The film was produced by American journalist and railroad heir Cornelius Vanderbilt IV, above
Staged: One of the films stranger parts is when Vanderbilt, left, stages a reenactment of his brief interview with Adolf Hilter, center, before the newly-elected chancellor gave a  speech at the Berlin Sports Palace in 1933
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Staged: One of the films stranger parts is when Vanderbilt, left, stages a reenactment of his brief interview with Adolf Hilter, center, before the newly-elected chancellor gave a speech at the Berlin Sports Palace in 1933
See it in person: The Museum of Modern Art in New York plans to screen the film next month
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See it in person: The Museum of Modern Art in New York plans to screen the film next month
In the 1970s, it was transferred to the archive, which holds some 70,000 titles in its vast vaults in Brussels, 80 per cent of them foreign. But it was only two years ago that the curators realized they had the only surviving copy.
The film has now been remastered and will be shown at New York's Museum of Modern Art in October.
The film is arranged much like a newsreel, where Vanderbilt provides a voice-over to his own original footage, and mixes it with newsreel footage from other sources.
News of the day: The film is shot in the style of a newsreel with Vanderbilt providing a voice-over to his original footage, mixed in with newsreel footage from other sources
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News of the day: The film is shot in the style of a newsreel with Vanderbilt providing a voice-over to his original footage, mixed in with newsreel footage from other sources
Bad omen: For the film, Vanderbilt traveled to the town in Austria where Hitler attended primary school and found he was one of the most unpopular kids. 'Nobody had a good word for him,' he said.
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Bad omen: For the film, Vanderbilt traveled to the town in Austria where Hitler attended primary school and found he was one of the most unpopular kids. 'Nobody had a good word for him,' he said.
'Vanderbilt was able to capture some spectacular footage but he just had a few minutes and they constructed a complete film around it. But that wasn't done by professional film-makers, so the film has a sometimes amateurish feel to it,' Mestdagh said.
Part of that feel comes from the somewhat clunky re-enactments of a brief interview that Vanderbilt snatched with Hitler as he prepared to address a rally in Berlin's Sports Palace after winning the 1933 election.
 
'In the hour-and-a-half that Hitler talked to that packed audience, he was as effective as a barker at a side show, traveling with a circus,' Vanderbilt comments in the voice-over.
He also visits Leonding, the Austrian town where Hitler attended primary school, explaining: 'From all I could gather, he was one of the most unpopular kids in the neighborhood. Nobody had a good word for him.'
































A crime museum is displaying the bullet-ridden skull of a pro-Nazi officer who was executed with his own gun as part of a macabre exhibition of Holocaust relics.
The display also features gold teeth extracted from Jews as they entered Auschwitz, muzzles used to German Shepherd dogs who patrolled the camps and attacked prisoners, and a series of syringes used in brutal medical tests on prisoners.
An SS officer's boot - with foot bones still inside - clogs used by Jews at a Nazi death camp, and toys taken from Jewish children also make up the collection at Littledean Crime Through Time Museum in Gloucestershire.
A crime museum in Gloucestershire is displaying the bullet-ridden skull of a pro-Nazi officer who was executed with his own gun as part of a macabre exhibition of Holocaust relics
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A crime museum in Gloucestershire is displaying the bullet-ridden skull of a pro-Nazi officer who was executed with his own gun as part of a macabre exhibition of Holocaust relics
Medical Syringes recovered from Auschwitz at the time of liberation. It is believed they were used to carry out gruesome medical tests on camp prisoners
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Medical Syringes recovered from Auschwitz at the time of liberation. It is believed they were used to carry out gruesome medical tests on camp prisoners
Gold dental caps that were removed by the Nazis from Jewish inmates on their arrival to Auschwitz during the holocaust years
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Gold dental caps that were removed by the Nazis from Jewish inmates on their arrival to Auschwitz during the holocaust years
Museum curator, Andy Jones, 52, said: 'The new exhibit features a collection of artefacts recovered at the end of the holocaust.
'The muzzle worn by a German Shephard dog in Auschwitz is the only one on display in the world.
'The prison guards would remove the muzzles and unleash the poison fanged hounds onto the prisoners - including pregnant Jewish women.
'Artefacts like the Jew's gold teeth reveal the brutal side of the holocaust.
'The Nazis would remove the prisoners crowns and gold teeth as they came into the camp.
'The guards would wrench them out with pliers and melt them down to create gold bars.'
The skull belongs to a Utase Black Legion Officer.
Toys taken from Jewish children as they entered Auschwitz also make up the collection at Littledean Crime Through Time Museum in Gloucestershire
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Toys taken from Jewish children as they entered Auschwitz also make up the collection at Littledean Crime Through Time Museum in Gloucestershire
A boot still containing the bones of the foot from a Nazi SS soldier
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A boot still containing the bones of the foot from a Nazi SS soldier
Well-worn homemade clogs used by inmates at a Nazi death camp
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Well-worn homemade clogs used by inmates at a Nazi death camp
It shows that his nose brutally smashed as he was pistol-whipped then executed with his own gun.
The Black Legion were a pro-Nazi group who massacred Chetniks, Partisans and Serb civilians during the holocaust.
It is believed that the officer's fatal injuries were inflicted when the prisoners were liberated - and then turned on their captors.
The collection also features Nazi SS insignia rings believed to have once belonged to officers
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The collection also features Nazi SS insignia rings believed to have once belonged to officers
The uniform striped hat belonging to a concentration camp inmate
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The uniform striped hat belonging to a concentration camp inmate
The hat is in stark contrast to this original Nazi SS NCO peak cap which will also be displayed
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The hat is in stark contrast to this original Nazi SS NCO peak cap which will also be displayed
A pair of spectacles removed from a Jewish inmate at Auschwitz
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A pair of spectacles removed from a Jewish inmate at Auschwitz
The collection also shows medical syringes recovered from Auschwitz - the implements were used in the brutal medical tests performed at the camp by the Nazis on the helpless prisoners.
Uniforms worn by inmates of the death camps and wrist restraints used by the Gestapo are a reminder of the atrocities committed during the war, and caps and honour rings worn by SS officers stand in sharp contrast to the tiny dolls confiscated from Jewish children as they entered the death camps.

House of horrors where a sadistic SS chief shot servants and prisoners for fun and inspired Spielberg's film is up for sale 

  • S-Captain Amon Goeth lived in a home on Jerozolimska Street in Krakow, Poland
  • Goeth oversaw the deaths of at least 8,000 inmates of a forced-Labour camp 
  • His old house has now been sold and the owner seems untroubled by its history
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Amon Goeth (pictured) and he lived in the house at various points from around February 1943 until the middle of September 1944
Amon Goeth (pictured) and he lived in the house at various points from around February 1943 until the middle of September 1944
The estate agent in the Polish city of Krakow must have had quite a sales patter. Not only is the house on Jerozolimska Street riddled with damp, missing some windows and its garden overgrown, but it boasts one previous genocidal occupant.
That man's name was SS-Captain Amon Goeth, and he lived in the house at various points from around February 1943 until the middle of September 1944, when his job involved running the forced-labour camp at Plaszow.
Chillingly played by Ralph Fiennes in Steven Spielberg's masterpiece, Schindler's List, Goeth oversaw the deaths of at least 8,000 inmates of the camp, many of whom he personally shot.
But despite being previously inhabited by such a notorious figure, the house has just been sold. What's more, the new owner seems untroubled by the building's history.
'Generally, I want to restore the house to be once again a Polish family house, and keep it like this,' says Artur Niemyski, who is planning to convert it into a luxury villa.
'My opinion is that this building was occupied for a small period by the Nazi, which should not influence this property for ever. Many houses in the area were occupied by Nazis.
'Officers from the camp lived in all the houses in the street. Bad things may have happened in the old properties, but basically these were living compounds.'
'Bad things' is putting it mildly, Mr Niemyski. One of the most famous and horrifying scenes in Schindler's List is when a corpulent and half-naked Goeth is shown coming out on to the balcony of the house one morning, casually picking up a high-powered rifle and randomly shooting prisoners working in the quarry below.
Although that scene was fictionalised — not least because in reality there's a hill that rises to the rear above the balcony — there is no doubt that Goeth did indeed shoot prisoners at random and on a whim.
One former prisoner, Willie Sterner, recalled how he was working in the paint shop in the camp when Goeth walked in and demanded to know why 30 men were working there instead of the official number of four. When the man who described himself as their foreman did not provide a satisfactory answer, Goeth went 'crazy', Sterner said.
'He took out his revolver and, in front of all the other painters, shot the man from Krakow who had claimed to be the foreman. In the second row of painters, the victim's father watched the murder of his son.'
At other times, Goeth would simply walk around the camp and shoot people at random.
This is the scene in Schindler's List where he is depicted shooting prisoners from his balcony 
This is the scene in Schindler's List where he is depicted shooting prisoners from his balcony 
'His biggest thrill was mass murder,' wrote Sterner in his memoirs, The Shadows Behind Me. 'He killed people whose faces he didn't like. We were easy targets for the Nazis — we had no place to hide. They couldn't miss.'
And even though the balcony scene did not take place on Jerozolimska Street, there are enough tales of terror attached to the building to make it a most disturbing place in which to create a family home.
One of those who worked in the house and experienced Goeth's psychopathic sadism at first hand was a young Jewish maid called Helen Horowitz.
Goeth treated Helen with savagery. On one occasion, he summoned her to explain why the sleeve of his uniform had a slight stain.
'It wasn't stained; the stain wasn't visible,' Helen later recalled.
She told Goeth that cleaning his uniform was not her responsibility, but that of his 'shoe-boy', Poldek.
'At this he raised his arm and hit me in the face so dreadfully hard that he perforated my ear,' Helen said. 'Immediately I heard bells in my ears and I said: 'I'm sorry, I must open the door, someone is ringing.'
Goeth then took Helen by the head and hit her with such force that blood spurted from her ear.
Through her agony, Helen noticed that as soon as Goeth saw blood, he seemed 'sated'.
'Go out, you arse!' he screamed at her. 'You whore! You Yiddish criminal!'
Decades later, Helen would state that she was always unable to go swimming because of that injury.
She would bear other scars, too, including one on her leg, caused when Goeth threw a knife at her for not laying out an extra place setting on the table.
'Instantly, I couldn't walk,' she said. 'But by willpower, strength — I didn't know one had such strong will if one is in misfortune — I overcame the pain and ran into the kitchen. And then I saw that he'd cut through a vein, and from then I've suffered with this leg.'
Another time, Goeth grabbed Helen by the breasts as punishment for asking to be reunited with her sister.
'I thought he was tearing out both my breasts, he jerked me with such force,' she said. 'He was a sadist, an indescribable sadist.
He took out his revolver and, in front of all the other painters, shot the man from Krakow who had claimed to be the foreman 
Former prisoner, Willie Sterner
'I tried to move back. I said: 'Herr Goeth, Commandant, I didn't know, I wanted to save my sister.' '
Goeth let go but then beat Helen and threw her against a dresser, and all the crockery fell out on her.
'Of course I was cut, I was bruised, but I kept silent,' she said. With his propensity for murderous violence, it is tempting to suppose that Goeth was somehow forged on the wrong side of the streets.
In fact, he came from a well-to-do family. His father was a successful publisher in Vienna, and Goeth studied agriculture at university.
At 6ft 4in, he was an accomplished sportsman who spent more time on the sportsfield than in lectures.
But he dropped out of university and, like so many other directionless young men, became attracted to the violent certainties of Nazism.
Progressing swiftly through the ranks of the SS, Goeth earned a reputation for being a sound administrator and a sadistically effective liquidator of Jewish ghettos.
He was a natural choice to run the Krakow-Plaszow camp at the age of 34. Supremely qualified, the role of commandant and its trappings — especially maids such as Helen Horowitz — suited the middle-class Goeth well.
But Helen was not the only young Jewish woman who had to keep quiet about the horrors of the house on Jerozolimska Street.
There was another maid, Helen Rozensweig, who was repeatedly subjected to violence at Goeth's hands.
On the first occasion, Goeth was displeased with how she was ironing a shirt. He grabbed her by the hair and shouted: 'You stupid Jew! Don't you know how to iron a shirt? In Austria, a girl your age knows how to cook and iron.'
Goeth then slapped her and warned her that she was forbidden to cry.
But such appalling maltreatments were comparatively lenient for the murderous Goeth. In a biography of Oskar Schindler by David Crowe, Helen recalled the gruesome fate of Lisiek, a young valet who went to the stable to fetch a carriage for a guest after a party.
This is Amon Goeth's former house which is on Jerozolimska Street in Krakow, Poland 
This is Amon Goeth's former house which is on Jerozolimska Street in Krakow, Poland 
'When he returned, Goeth asked him why he had done this without permission. Lisiek, frightened, did not answer. Goeth then took out his pistol and shot him dead.'
Shooting was not the only way Goeth killed people. Another was to use his vicious pet dog, Ralph, which Helen had to brush and feed.
'He would give this order to the dog and it would tear people apart,' Helen said. 'Tear people apart; grab them by parts of the body.'
Helen remembers another occasion which may have been the basis of the notorious balcony scene. One day she saw Goeth standing by the window with a machine gun, watching Jewish labourers digging ditches and carrying rocks on the road next to his garden.
'He said to me: 'Look at those pigs. If they don't start working in a few seconds, they are all going to be dead.' ' Helen ran from the villa to tell the people working below that their lives were in danger.
'If I hadn't slid down that hill [to warn them], there would [have been] shooting,' she said.
In the film, the experiences of both maids were blended into a single character. But contrary to the movie, in real life it appears that Goeth was not sexually attracted to either of them.
The 'honour' of sharing his bed fell to Ruth Irene Kalder, an actress and beautician from Wroclaw in Poland, who lived the high life in the villa while Goeth was working and killing Jews.
'His mistress lived with the luxuries, beautified herself all day,' said Helen Rozensweig.
'Lying with masks on her face, doing all kinds of mixtures for her skin . . . she put music on so she didn't hear or know anything.'
Many years later, Kalder — who took Goeth's name despite not marrying him — would claim to know little, if anything, of what was truly happening at the camp.
'He got up in the morning and went to his office and came home for dinner, and then he went back, and came home for supper,' she disingenuously told a Thames TV documentary team in the early Eighties. Kalder also reminisced matter-of-factly about the house.
'It was a little villa,' she said, almost snootily in her broken English. 'Downstairs a big living room and a sleeping room and upstairs some guest rooms and a sports room.
'It was not very luxury. It had nice living rooms with big chairs and a piano and things like this.'
Of course, the villa was a world away from the conditions in which the Jews lived in the camp, crammed into freezing blockhouses where lice and disease were rampant.
Food was barely enough to sustain life, let alone work in the quarry. The lack of food was so atrocious Jews would stand outside the kitchen block and root through the rubbish looking for scraps.
For their pains, Ukrainian SS men would shoot the foragers on sight — as if they were rats.
And, of course, the other ever-present threat to life was the chance of being shot 'for sport' by the commandant, who would go home every evening to what one survivor called 'the most luxurious life'.
'He had a beautiful villa. There were daily deliveries of fresh meat, fresh cold cuts, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, wine, liquor.'
But the high life would not last for ever. Goeth was captured by the Americans at the end of the war and handed over to the Poles, who put him on trial in August 1946.
He was repellently unapologetic. When he was shown the lengthy list of witnesses assembled by the prosecution, he said: 'What? So many Jews? And we were always told there'd be none left.'
Like so many other Nazis, Goeth pleaded that he was not guilty, as he was only following orders — and besides, it was others who had carried out the killings, not him.
His defence did not wash, and he was hanged on September 13, 1946. As the noose went around his neck, he muttered: 'Heil Hitler.'
Goeth's mistress survived the war but killed herself shortly after being interviewed by Thames TV.
In a cheering twist of fate, the two Helens outlived their tormentor, and were able to tell the world the horrors that took place in that dreadful house in Krakow.
Like the houses of other murderers, the building should surely be bulldozed.
It is no place to call home.





































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