CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

Saturday, November 14, 2015

THIS IS WAR

 

 

 

   

Paris attack sees 127 dead after Eagles of Death Metal concert hostages are killed

 
 
   

 

     

France was in a nationwide state of emergency today after at least 127 people were killed in a series of coordinated terror attacks in the heart of Paris that have paralysed the country. At least eight militants, all wearing suicide vests, brought unprecedented violence to the streets of the French capital in the bloodiest attack in Europe since the Madrid train bombings in 2004. Armed with AK47 machine guns and shouting 'Allahu Akbar', four of the group marched into a rock concert at the Bataclan theatre, massacring up to 100 people and taking dozens hostage. Chilling footage emerged showing the moment terrified concert-goers left a trail of blood in their wake as they dragged their friends along a street (centre) while a woman clung desperately to a window ledge (left and right) while trying to flee the carnage. Another 11 people were gunned down at a Cambodian restaurant while two suicide bombers blew themselves up outside the Stade de France sports stadium where Francois Hollande was watching the French football team play Germany. The French President has vowed to strike back 'mercilessly after the worst attacks in France since the Second World War which left bodies littered in streets across the city (inset) and declared three days of national mourning.

 

     
 












Hollande vows to 'strike back' after ISIS 'barbarians' kill 127 in Paris: Fans flee rock concert as gunmen blow themselves up before terrorist opens fire in restaurant and bombers hit stadium

  • At least 127 people killed and dozens wounded in a series of co-ordinated terror attacks in heart of Paris last night
  • Up to 100 were massacred in the Bataclan concert hall after suicide bombers took hostage then blew themselves up
  • Chilling footage shows concert-goers dragging blood-soaked friends from scene and woman hanging from window
  • The terrorists shouted 'Allah Akbar' and 'this is for Syria' as they burst in and opened fire, eyewitnesses have said
  • Another 11 people were gunned down at a Cambodian restaurant by militant brandishing an AK-47 machine gun
  • Two suicide bombers targeted the Stade de France stadium where President Francois Hollande was watching game
  • The French President has declared a state of emergency for the whole country and reinstates border checks
  • He has vowed to 'mercilessly' strike back after blaming ISIS and has declared three days of national mourning

Distraught friends and family have launched a desperate search for loved ones – including a British man – feared dead in the Paris massacre after ISIS militants slaughtered 127 people in a series of attacks across the French capital.

People are sharing pictures and information about the missing on Twitter with the hashtag 'RechercheParis' – which means 'search Paris'.

The hashtag has now spawned its own Twitter accounts and Facebook page, with dozens of people posting photos alongside desperate pleas for news.

Many of those missing were at the concert at Bataclan concert hall last night, where more than 80 people were killed.

Among them was Nick Alexander, thought to be originally from Colchester in Essex. The Foreign Office said it is ‘investigating’ reports of British casualties.

Scroll down for videos

Fleeing the massacre: A dramatic new video has emerged showing desperate Paris terror attack victims escaping from a theatre where jihadi gunmen slaughtered dozens of concert-goers, with some (above) dragging their bleeding friends along the ground to safety

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Fleeing the massacre: A dramatic new video has emerged showing desperate Paris terror attack victims escaping from a theatre where jihadi gunmen slaughtered dozens of concert-goers, with some (above) dragging their bleeding friends along the ground to safety

 

The footage shows a woman hanging from the second floor window of the Bataclan theatre, while others run for their lives into the street The footage shows a woman hanging from the second floor window of the Bataclan theatre, while others run for their lives into the street

 

The footage shows a woman hanging from the second floor window of the Bataclan theatre, while others run for their lives into the street

A victim under a blanket lays dead outside the Bataclan theatre in Paris where around 100 concert-goers were massacred by jihadi gunmen

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A victim under a blanket lays dead outside the Bataclan theatre in Paris where around 100 concert-goers were massacred by jihadi gunmen

Bodies of victims being dragged down the streets of Paris

'Searching for Precilla Correia, who was at Bataclan with Manu Perez,' tweeted Bataclan (@jesuisbataclan1).

Severine Kimmel (@severinekimmel) wrote: 'I am desperate without news of my friend Gaëlle, who was at Bataclan. Have you seen her?'

Zoe Njoy wrote on Facebook: 'Still no news of our friend Hugo Sarrade who was at Bataclan last night... Has someone seen him?'

France was placed in lockdown after eight militants, all wearing suicide vests, brought unprecedented violence to the streets of the French capital in the bloodiest attack in Europe since the Madrid train bombings in 2004.

Francois Hollande accused ISIS of orchestrating the worst attacks in France for more than 70 years, declaring it an 'act of war' and vowing to 'mercilessly' strike back against the jihadi 'barbarians'.

In a televised address, the French President said the attacks were 'committed by a terrorist army, the Islamic State group, a jihadist army, against France, against the values that we defend everywhere in the world, against what we are: a free country that means something to the whole planet'.

ISIS later claimed responsibility for the attacks in revenge for French air strikes in Iraq and Syria and warned: 'This is just the start of a storm'. It was also reported that one of the suicide bombers was found with a Syrian passport. 

Police are also hunting accomplices amid fears of further attacks, with the arrest of a 51-year-old man in Germany last week after firearms were discovered in his car now being linked to the atrocities, according to media reports.

Police are also reportedly chasing a car containing four 'heavily armed men' who stormed through a police road block as they headed towards Paris.

A victim is wheeled out of the Bataclan concert hall where Islamic State gunmen mercilessly slaughtered up to 100 fans before blowing themselves up in a series of co-ordinated attacks across the French capital

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A victim is wheeled out of the Bataclan concert hall where Islamic State gunmen mercilessly slaughtered up to 100 fans before blowing themselves up in a series of co-ordinated attacks across the French capital

A medic takes a victim's body away from the scene of the Bataclan concert hall where up to 100 fans were shot dead at a heavy metal gig

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A medic takes a victim's body away from the scene of the Bataclan concert hall where up to 100 fans were shot dead at a heavy metal gig

 

Blood and medical items are pictured outside the Bataclan concert hall Tributes are placed next to blood stains near the scene of the Bataclan Theatre

Tributes are placed next to blood stains and medical items outside the Bataclan concert hall, evidence of desperate attempts to save victims who was attacked by jihadi gunmen in a series of terror attacks across the French capital

Officers are said to be in pursuit of a Citroën Berlingo after it forced its way through a toll on the A10 in the Ablis area of Yvelines in north-west France.

In an indication of the heightened state of alert, it was earlier reported that armed officers and a police helicopter were scrambled to the Bagnolet area of Paris following reports of gunfire and explosions.

Residents were reportedly told to stay indoors but local authorities later confirmed the 'explosions' were the result of fireworks being let off at a wedding celebration.

France was in a nationwide state of emergency today after at least 127 people were killed in a series of coordinated terror attacks in the heart of Paris that have paralysed the country.

Armed with AK47 machine guns and shouting 'Allahu Akbar', four of the group marched into a rock concert at the Bataclan theatre, massacring up to 100 people and taking dozens hostage.

Video footage emerged of the stampede into a street behind the theatre shows concert-goers leaving a trail of blood as they drag their dying friends from the scene.

Belongings of victims lay on the pavement outside the Bataclan concert hall. French President Francois Hollande said at least 127 people died  in shootings at Paris cafes, suicide bombings near France's national stadium and a hostage-taking slaughter at a concert

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Belongings of victims lay on the pavement outside the Bataclan concert hall. French President Francois Hollande said at least 127 people died in shootings at Paris cafes, suicide bombings near France's national stadium and a hostage-taking slaughter at a concert

A forensic scientist inspects the scene outside of the Cafe Bonne Biere on Rue du Faubourg du Temple in Paris on Saturday

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A forensic scientist inspects the scene outside of the Cafe Bonne Biere on Rue du Faubourg du Temple in Paris on Saturday

Snipers patrol the meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris where President Francois Hollande was holding an emergency security meeting

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Snipers patrol the meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris where President Francois Hollande was holding an emergency security meeting

One woman clung desperately to the window ledge of the second floor as she tried to hide from the terrorists.

Meanwhile, bodies lie by the entrance – all apparently dead, before one moves and attempts to stand. Bleeding heavily, and unable to lift themselves, the camera captures the moment they try to use their phone – possibly to call for help. 

The video was taken by Le Monde journalist Daniel Psenny from his flat in a building opposite. He was later injured himself, shot in the arm through his window.

Witnesses reported hearing at least one of the terrorists at the Bataclan Theatre speaking perfect French.

The horror started when two suicide bombers blew themselves up outside the Stade de France sports stadium where Mr Hollande was watching the French football team play Germany. 

A Syrian passport was retrieved from one of the suicide bombers who targeted the football stadium, according to two French police officers, while the second is believed to have been as young as 15 years old. 

Fanatics later attacked Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge and the bar-cafe Le Carillon on Rue Alibert around five miles away.

According to a woman who was in the Cambodian restaurant, a gunman shouted 'Allahu Akbar' (God is great in Arabic) before firing.

French prosecutors say 14 were killed and several critically injured. Eyewitnesses reported hearing a sound like fireworks before they realised the gravity of the situation and desperately tried to flee or hide.

Another gun attack happened at la Casa Nostra in Rue de la Fontaine au Roi and nearby bar La Bonne Biere in Rue du Faubourg de Temple with eyewitnesses reporting seeing five bodies. Another witness said he saw shots being fired from a Ford Focus.

Meanwhile the sidewalk terrace of La Belle Equipe on Rue de Charonne was showered in gunfire, killing as many as 18 people. There were reports that a Japanese restaurant on the road was also targeted.

Some 1,500 extra soldiers have been mobilised to guard French facilities while schools and universities were closed.

A mourner pays his respect outside the Le Carillon restaurant the morning after a series of deadly attacks in Paris that killed at least 127

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A mourner pays his respect outside the Le Carillon restaurant the morning after a series of deadly attacks in Paris that killed at least 127

Shock: A woman breaks down in tears while visiting Le Carillon cafe, where around 14 people were killed in the terror attacks

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Shock: A woman breaks down in tears while visiting Le Carillon cafe, where around 14 people were killed in the terror attacks

Police patrol  in front of the Louvre Pyramid at the Louvre museum in Paris as the country was placed in a nationwide state of emergency

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Police patrol in front of the Louvre Pyramid at the Louvre museum in Paris as the country was placed in a nationwide state of emergency

Soldiers were deployed at key sites around Paris, including Parliament buildings and religious sites, while in a highly unusual move Disneyland Paris has been closed to the public 

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Soldiers were deployed at key sites around Paris, including Parliament buildings and religious sites, while in a highly unusual move Disneyland Paris has been closed to the public

President Francois Hollande speaks to French Prime minister Manuel Valls while leaving the Elysee Palace in Paris after a security meeting

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President Francois Hollande speaks to French Prime minister Manuel Valls while leaving the Elysee Palace in Paris after a security meeting

Many French schools are normally open on Saturdays, but the French government ordered them shuttered as part of emergency security measures.

As a precaution, all sports events were cancelled on Saturday, while access to public facilities such as museums and swimming pools was restricted.

Soldiers were deployed at key sites around Paris, including Parliament buildings and religious sites, while in a highly unusual move Disneyland Paris has been closed to the public.

The government has also re-imposed border controls that were abandoned as part of Europe's free-travel zone.

Border and customs officers will check people, baggage and vehicles entering and leaving France by road, train, sea or plane, said customs official Melanie Lacuire.

Security checks were also reinforced outside French official buildings in various capitals including Vienna, where a international meeting on the conflict in Syria was taking place.

Governments also called for heightened vigilance from the general public.

Britain's Foreign Office updated its travel advice for France urging its citizens to 'exercise caution in public places' while Belgium said its nationals should avoid unnecessary travel south of the border altogether.

Handcuffed: A man is arrested by police near the Bataclan theatre where up to 100 concert-goers were massacred by ISIS militants in a night of terror on the streets of Paris. It is not know if this man was detained in connection with the attacks

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Handcuffed: A man is arrested by police near the Bataclan theatre where up to 100 concert-goers were massacred by ISIS militants in a night of terror on the streets of Paris. It is not know if this man was detained in connection with the attacks

At least 127 people have been killed in a series of coordinated terror attacks in the heart of Paris which have paralysed the French capital. Pictured: A restaurant on Rue Bichat where several people were shot dead last night

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At least 127 people have been killed in a series of coordinated terror attacks in the heart of Paris which have paralysed the French capital. Pictured: A restaurant on Rue Bichat where several people were shot dead last night

Bodies litter the streets of a Paris alley after a string of terror attacks in the French capital which led President Francois Hollande to declare a national state of emergency

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Bodies litter the streets of a Paris alley after a string of terror attacks in the French capital which led President Francois Hollande to declare a national state of emergency

Victims of the shooting attack lay on the pavement with medics outside La Belle Equipe restaurant in Paris

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Victims of the shooting attack lay on the pavement with medics outside La Belle Equipe restaurant in Paris

French fire brigade members aid an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris

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French fire brigade members aid an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris

A soldier stands by victims in the 10th district of Paris where an AK47 wielding fanatic gunned down 11 people at a Cambodian restaurant

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A soldier stands by victims in the 10th district of Paris where an AK47 wielding fanatic gunned down 11 people at a Cambodian restaurant

Two police officials said at least 11 people were killed in the restaurant shootout in Paris

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Two police officials said at least 11 people were killed in the restaurant shootout in Paris

Some at the Bataclan concert hall escaped through an emergency exit, while others left through the roof and went to an adjacent apartment. Above, a trio embrace each other after the attacks

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Some at the Bataclan concert hall escaped through an emergency exit, while others left through the roof and went to an adjacent apartment. Above, a trio embrace each other after the attacks

A victim's body lies covered on Boulevard des Filles du Calvaire, close to the Bataclan theatre

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A victim's body lies covered on Boulevard des Filles du Calvaire, close to the Bataclan theatre

Bloodied: A French policeman assists a blood-covered victim near the Bataclan concert hall following the attacks

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Bloodied: A French policeman assists a blood-covered victim near the Bataclan concert hall following the attacks

French special forces storm Bataclan to free hostages

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron said he would review national security after talks with key ministers at Downing Street.

'We must be prepared for a number of British casualties,' he said after an emergency cabinet meeting in Downing Street that kept the threat level for Britain at 'severe' - the second highest attacks.

In a message of solidarity to the people of France, he added: 'Your values are our values, your pain is our pain, your fight is our fight.'

Similar meetings were being held by governments across Europe, including in Austria, Germany, Italy and Spain.

The Queen sent her condolences to the French people in a message to the president, telling Mr Hollande that she and the Duke of Edinburgh were 'deeply shocked and saddened by the terrible loss of life'.

The Prince of Wales has condemned the Paris terrorist atrocities as 'bestial attacks' and said he wanted to express his 'utter, total horror' at what had happened.

Hospitals appeared so overwhelmed, a junior doctor called on other medical staff to offer assistance in a number of location across Paris amid reports as many as 180 people had been wounded.

They tweeted: 'Present yourself to your nearest hospital and help in any way you can. If you are not needed at your local hospital, the following hospitals are in need of help: Bichat, Pitié Salpêtrière, HEGP, Lariboisière.'

French President Francois Hollande declared a national state of emergency following what he called 'unprecedented terror attacks', reinstating border checks and deployed 1,500 extra troops to the capital. Initially it had been reported that France had closed its borders.

 

French riot police appear to hold a man down on the streets of Paris, following a series of deadly attacks in the French capital

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French riot police appear to hold a man down on the streets of Paris, following a series of deadly attacks in the French capital

A man lies on the ground as French police check his identity near the Bataclan concert hall following a series of terror attacks in Paris

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A man lies on the ground as French police check his identity near the Bataclan concert hall following a series of terror attacks in Paris

French special forces evacuate people, including an injured man holding his head, as people gather near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings

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French special forces evacuate people, including an injured man holding his head, as people gather near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings

Rescue workers help a woman after the shooting at Bataclan theatre

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Rescue workers help a woman after the shooting at Bataclan theatre

French fire brigade members help an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris, France

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French fire brigade members help an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris, France

TIMELINE OF TERROR: HOW A NIGHT OF CARNAGE UNFOLDED IN THE VERY HEART OF PARIS

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There was a shootout at a restaurant on the Rue Bichat, two explosions near the Stade de France sports stadium and another shooting at the Paris Bataclan concert hall

21:20 First explosion hits the Stade de France, where France were playing Germany. French president Francois Hollande was evacuated.

21:25 First shooting hits Le Carillon bar and Le Petit Cambodge Restaurant on the Rue Alibert. At least 14 deaths.

21:29 Shooting at the Avenue de la Republique, close to the other restaurants. Four people died. The nearby Casa Nostra restaurant was also targeted, with five deaths reported.

21:30 Second explosion at the Stade de France, believed to be a suicide bomber. French president Francois Hollande, who was watching the game, was evacuated.

21:38 Shooting at La Belle Equipe bar on the Rue de Charonne, several miles from the other sites. At least 19 deaths.

21:43 Explosion reported on Boulevard Voltaire. Details are sparse, one man believed to have died.

21:49 Four gunmen storm the Bataclan theatre, using grenades and assault rifles. The men took more than 100 hostages and started to murder them one by one. At least 80 deaths have been confirmed, with many more injuries.

21:53 Third explosion at the Stade de France, near a McDonald's. Three deaths in total have been confirmed from the stadium – it is not clear whether these are the suicide bombers themselves.

22:00 Shooting on the boulevard Beaumarchais, where four more deaths were reported.

00:20 Police storm the Batalcan in the hope of stopping the hostage massacre. Seven gunmen blow themselves up with suicide vests, an eighth was killed by police.

Terrorists launched a total of six coordinated attacks at high-profile sites across Paris:

  • Two suicide bomb attacks at a bar near the Stade de France led to President Hollande being evacuated from the stadium. He has since declared a national state of emergency.
  • Two terrorists with AK47s burst into the Bataclan concert hall, where rock band Eagles of Death Metal were performing. They sprayed bullets and threw grenades into thousands of people before they started slaughtering people one by one.
  • A terrorist armed with an AK47 killed at least 11 people at Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge on Rue Bichat at around 9pm.
  • Gunfire and bomb blasts have also been reported at the Louvre art gallery, the Pompidou Centre and Les Halles shopping centre.

Witnesses have told of the horror which unfolded inside the Bataclan theatre, where more than 1,000 people were watching rock band Eagles of Death Metal perform.

The told of how AK47 wielding terrorists shouted 'Allah Akbar' as they 'blindly' opened fire into a crowd of people.

'It looked like a battlefield, there was blood everywhere, there were bodies everywhere,' Marc Coupris, 57, told the Guardian.

He added: 'I was at the far side of the hall when shooting began. There seemed to be at least two gunmen. They shot from the balcony.

'They shot at 'very young' people in the violent attack which lasted around 15 minutes, said Julien Pearce, a journalist at Europe 1. The gunmen, who witnesses have described as young men in theirs 20s, reloaded three or four times as they gunned down innocent people at random. 

People run after hearing what is believed to be explosions or gun shots near Place de la Republique square in Paris

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People run after hearing what is believed to be explosions or gun shots near Place de la Republique square in Paris

At least 11 people were killed in the restaurant, close to where the Charlie Hebdo shootings occurred in January, and another 15 killed in the theatre

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At least 11 people were killed in the restaurant, close to where the Charlie Hebdo shootings occurred in January, and another 15 killed in the theatre

 

'Three men with Kalashnikovs and wearing flak jackets burst in in the middle of the concert,' another man, a man named Hervé, told the Telegraph after escaping through an emergency exit.

He said the men were not wearing masks, adding: 'They just started spraying bullets. I saw a girl hit right in front of me. There must have been quite a few dead.'

Another man said: 'The men came in and started shooting. Everyone fell to the ground. It was hell.

'I took my mum, and we hid. Someone near us said they have gone, so we ran out.'

And Gilles Avel said: 'We are all terrified, and have been told to get away as soon as possible.'

A witness who was near the front of the concert when he saw a man wearing a cap firing into the crowd.

He told the Liberation newspaper: 'He shot in my direction. People started falling and throwing themselves towards the ground.

'I think the guy next to me was dead. I went out of the emergency exit at the opposite end of the road. It was only once in the road that I started to see people covered in blood. 

Another witness, Pierre Janaszak, a radio presenter, told AFP he was sitting in the balconies with his sister and friends, when they heard shots from below about one hour into the show.

'At first, we thought it was part of the show but we quickly understood. They were three I think and they were just firing into the crowd.

'They were armed with big guns, I imagine Kalashnikovs, it was a hell of a noise. They didn't stop firing.

'There was blood everywhere, corpses everywhere. We heard screaming. Everyone was trying to flee.'

'They had 20 hostages, and we could hear them talking with them,' said Janaszak, who was hiding with several others in the toilet.

'I clearly heard them say 'It's the fault of Hollande, it's the fault of your president, he should not have intervened in Syria'. They also spoke about Iraq.'

Aftermath of Paris shooting caught on camera by bystander

 

A French police officer takes cover while on the lookout for the shooters who attacked the restaurant 'Le Petit Cambodge'

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A French police officer takes cover while on the lookout for the shooters who attacked the restaurant 'Le Petit Cambodge'

Forensic police search for evidence inside the La Belle Equipe cafe, where several people were killed 

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Forensic police search for evidence inside the La Belle Equipe cafe, where several people were killed

At least 26 people have been killed and at least seven wounded in terror attacks in central Paris, it has been reported

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At least 26 people have been killed and at least seven wounded in terror attacks in central Paris, it has been reported

French President Francoise Hollande declared a national state of emergency following what he called 'unprecedented terror attacks'

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French President Francoise Hollande declared a national state of emergency following what he called 'unprecedented terror attacks'

On guard: A machine gun-wielding police officer stands to attention on a street near the scene of the restaurant shooting

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On guard: A machine gun-wielding police officer stands to attention on a street near the scene of the restaurant shooting

Witnesses have told of how they saw bodies littering the streets of Paris after a machine gun wielding attacker went on a rampage in central Paris 

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Witnesses have told of how they saw bodies littering the streets of Paris after a machine gun wielding attacker went on a rampage in central Paris

Machine gun fire and screams were heard from inside a restaurant close to the Rue Bichat  at around 9pm

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Machine gun fire and screams were heard from inside a restaurant close to the Rue Bichat at around 9pm

VICTIMS CONFIRMED DEAD SO FAR

At least 127 people have been killed in the terror attacks across Paris.

Among those confirmed dead so far include:

Two Belgians

A statement on Eagles Of Death Metal's Facebook page said: 'We are still currently trying to determine the safety and whereabouts of all our band and crew. Our thoughts are with all of the people involved in this tragic situation.'

The two explosions in a bar near the Stade de France stadium were detonated by suicide bombers, it has been confirmed.

A witness said the explosions were loud enough to be heard over the sound of cheering fans. Sirens were heard immediately and a helicopter was seen circling overhead.

A 27-year-old man, who was just 30ft from the explosion, said he felt like he was 'in a video game'.

Speaking to the Daily Mail, he said: 'There was an explosion in front of us. It was a very loud noise. At first I thought it was a bin that had been set alight. But then I thought it wasn't a fire cracker.

'Everyone stopped. A man was on the floor screaming. I don't know what happened to the man. I just heard him scream and move around the floor. He wasn't unconscious.'

As he approached the stadium door around three minutes later, a second bomb went off 15ft from where he was standing.

He added: 'It was a very loud noise. I've never heard anything like it. My heart jumped. There were 20 of us. We started running. The match had started 15 minutes before.

'The doormen started locking the stadium doors... it was shocking to see. I thought, "that could have been me".'

Spectators invade the pitch of the Stade de France stadium after two explosions were heard during the international friendly soccer France against Germany

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Spectators invade the pitch of the Stade de France stadium after two explosions were heard during the international friendly soccer France against Germany

Spectators wait on the pitch of the during the match between France and Germany at Stade de France after two suicide bombers detonated explosives outside

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Spectators wait on the pitch of the during the match between France and Germany at Stade de France after two suicide bombers detonated explosives outside

 

I was at the back of the bar. I couldn't see anything. I heard gunshots. People dropped to the ground. We put a table over our heads to protect us. We were held up in the bar because there was a pile of bodies in front of us

Witness in concert hall

Players briefly stopped in their tracks when they heard the twin blasts. Following news of the attack, thousands of fans - too scared to leave the stadium - poured onto the pitch.

Earlier in the night, an AK47 wielding gunman attacked a Cambodian restaurant, Le Petit Cambodge, in the Bastille area of the city, while grenade blasts were also heard.

Police and other emergency services are at the scene, which is close to where the Charlie Hebdo attack happened in January.

Images posted online showed the cracked windows of what appeared to be the restaurant under attack.

Dozens of people were standing outside their cars on the junction opposite and the lights of police cars could be seen above them.

Eyewitness Ben Grant, who was in a nearby bar with his wife at the time, said he saw six or seven bodies on the ground.

He told the BBC: 'I was told people in cars had opened fire on the bar. There are lots of dead people. It's pretty horrific to be honest.

'I was at the back of the bar. I couldn't see anything. I heard gunshots. People dropped to the ground. We put a table over our heads to protect us. We were held up in the bar because there was a pile of bodies in front of us.'

Emilioi Macchio from Italy was at a bar close to where the restaurant shooting took place, and said it 'sounded like fireworks'.

 

Images posted online showed the cracked windows of what appeared to be the restaurant under attack

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Images posted online showed the cracked windows of what appeared to be the restaurant under attack

Police and other emergency services are at the scene, which is close to where the Charlie Hebdo attack happened in January 

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Police and other emergency services are at the scene, which is close to where the Charlie Hebdo attack happened in January

French fire brigade members help an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris

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French fire brigade members help an injured individual near the Bataclan concert hall following fatal shootings in Paris

 

EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBERS FOR PEOPLE CONCERNED ABOUT LOVED ONES IN PARIS

People concerned about loved ones in Paris can contact the Foreign Office in London on 020 7008 0000.

The Irish Department of Foreign Affairs also has staff on hand in Dublin to take calls from concerned families on 01 408 2000.

Facebook has customised its safety check feature to let users know whether their friends and loved ones are safe: https://www.facebook.com/safetycheck/paris-terror-attacks/

Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to be publicly named.

President Hollande said last night: 'France needs to be strong. Terrorists want us to be scared. In the face of terror we must be united.'

'We have, on my decision, mobilised all forces possible to neutralise the terrorists and make all concerned areas safe. I have also asked for military reinforcements. They are currently in the Paris area, to ensure that no new attack can take place. I have also called a cabinet meeting that will be held in a few minutes.

'Two decisions will be taken - a state of emergency will be declared, which means that some places will be closed, traffic may be banned, and there will also be searches which may be decided throughout Ile de France [greater Paris].'

The state of emergency ordered by Hollande last night is an exceptional clampdown on civil liberties. It gives the authorities virtual total power over the movement of people and vehicles at all times.

Curfews, travel restrictions and house arrests are all in the power of the police. Closure of public places – as is planned tomorrow – all come under the law and all media, movie screenings and theatre performances are also within the strict remit of the government.

Paris' deputy mayor said the attacks were a horrific reminder of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January, adding: 'It's a heavy recollection of what happened in January (C. Hebdo). Now we are struck again. This is harder. I am shaken.'

U.S. President Barack Obama last night branded the carnage in Paris an 'attack on humanity' and claimed it was an 'outrageous attempt to terrorise innocent civilians'.

 

Emergency services strat to tend to the injured at the terroist attack at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris

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Emergency services strat to tend to the injured at the terroist attack at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris

At least 35 people are thought to have been killed inside the Bataclan concert hall and several people were wounded (pictured)

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At least 35 people are thought to have been killed inside the Bataclan concert hall and several people were wounded (pictured)

 

French President Francois Hollande (pictured) is escorted out of the Stade de France by his security team before the end of the France versus Germany football match

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French President Francois Hollande (pictured) is escorted out of the Stade de France by his security team before the end of the France versus Germany football match

He said: 'This is an attack not just on Paris, not just on the people of France, it's an attack on all of humanity and the universal values we share. This is a heart-breaking situation, and obviously those of us here in the United States know what it's like.'

David Cameron said that he was 'shocked by events in Paris' and pledged to do 'whatever we can to help', adding: 'Our thoughts and prayers are with the French people.' 

The restaurant targeted Friday, Le Carillon, is in the same general neighborhood as the Charlie Hebdo offices.

France has been on edge since ISIS extremists launched a bloody attack on the satirical newspaper and a kosher grocery that left 20 people – including the three attackers – dead.

FACEBOOK ROLLS OUT 'SAFETY CHECK' IN WAKE OF PARIS ATTACKS

Facebook has customised its safety check feature to let users know whether their friends and loved ones are safe in Paris.

More than 140 people have been killed in tragic attacks across several locations in the French capital in the past few hours.

Users in Paris are now being sent notifications by Facebook's mobile app, asking them whether they are safe, and offering to check on any of their friends.

Twitter users have also responded, urging citizens to offer shelter to anyone in need, using #PorteOuverte

The Facebook 'Safety Check' tool, which can be found here, lets you input whether you are safe or not in the affected area.

Users in Paris are being sent notifications by Facebook's mobile app, asking them whether they are safe, and offering to check on any of their friends. If Facebook notices that you are using a device in an affected area in Paris, it will ask: 'Are you safe?'

Users can then also see how other friends and family in an affected area are doing and can mark people as 'safe'.

If Facebook notices that you are using a device in an affected area in Paris, it will ask: 'Are you safe?'

Your location is determined by the city listed in your profile, you last location if you use the Nearby Friends product or the city where you are using the internet.

It can be used around the world on Android, iOS, feature phone and on computers.

If you're not in the area, you can select 'I'm not in the area.'

The attack on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo left 13 dead when two Paris born terrorists slaughtered its cartoonists and general staff members.

Four Jewish shoppers were also murdered in the same set of attacks inside a Kosher supermarket in nearby Vincennes.

The French capital has been on a high state of alert ever since, with security services warning that another attack was always likely.

Since then there have been a number of more minor strikes or attempts. In one, three Americans and a Briton overpowered a heavily armed gunman on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

ISIS's online supporters have already started to celebrate the devastating attack in Paris, using the hashtag 'Paris in fire' on social media, but it has not been confirmed whether the terror group is behind the attacks.

'They are cutting us down one by one...dead bodies everywhere': 118 people killed at theatre after police storm it, shoot dead three jihadists and release 125 more hostages

An injured hostage inside a Paris theatre described how terrorists were slaughtering 'everyone one by one' in one of a series of attacks that are thought to have killed at least 142 people.

Benjamin Cazenoves, one of those held captive during a rock concert, wrote on social media: 'I'm still at the Bataclan. 1st floor. Hurt Bad! There are survivors inside. They are cutting down all the world. One by one.'

He added in another Facebook post: 'Alive. Just cuts... Carnage... Dead bodies everywhere.'

Reports said that French security forces had successfully stormed the building, freed the surviving hostages and killed three terrorists thought to be among six or seven who perpetrated attacks throughout Paris on Friday night.

 

A man inside the Bataclan theatre in Paris that was taken over by terrorists said that the assailants were slaughtering hostages 'one by one'. Above, French special forces evacuate people from the building

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A man inside the Bataclan theatre in Paris that was taken over by terrorists said that the assailants were slaughtering hostages 'one by one'. Above, French special forces evacuate people from the building

Benjamin Cazenoves later said that he was alive and just had cuts, but that others had been killed. Sources say that at least 100 had died in the attack

A gunman who yelled 'Allah Akbar' is believed to have taken at least 100 people hostage at the Bataclan theatre (pictured) in Paris

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A gunman who yelled 'Allah Akbar' is believed to have taken at least 100 people hostage at the Bataclan theatre (pictured) in Paris

The California rock band The Eagles of Death Metal had been playing Thursday night. A post on the band's Facebook page said that the safety of the group was still being determined.

Witnesses described unmasked men in their early 20s with Kalashnikov assault rifles bursting into the middle of the concert and begin spraying bullets at attendees as they reloaded three or four times.

The onslaught lasted for maybe ten minutes as people screamed and cowered on the floor, covering their heads in a vain bid to escape the bullets, a witness told the Daily Mail.

''I was in the pit at the front. I heard bangs go off. I turned round and I saw a silhouette with a cap on who was heading towards the back door,' one witness told the newspaper Liberation.

'He shot in my direction. People started falling and throwing themselves towards the ground'.

Others described hiding in rooms by the stage before making a break for the emergency exit left of the stage, while others said they escaped to the roof and were helped by a man in an apartment adjacent to the theatre.

Survivors of the attack were tended to be emergency personnel after some escaped during the shooting and others were freed by security forces

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Survivors of the attack were tended to be emergency personnel after some escaped during the shooting and others were freed by security forces

Above, a photo of the band during their show at the Bataclan before the terrorist attack thought to have killed at least 100

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Above, a photo of the band during their show at the Bataclan before the terrorist attack thought to have killed at least 100

Journalist Julien Pierce told CNN that the gunmen did not shout slogans as they massacred their victims.

He said: 'They didn't say anything. Not Allah akhbar or something like this. They said nothing. They just shot. They just shoot.'

The Bataclan theatre had previously supported the magazine Charlie Hebdo after the satirical publication was attacked in January this year.

A photo of the hall shows the marquee with the phrase 'Je Suis Charlie', used in support of the attack's victims. 

According to a woman in the restaurant where shots first broke out near the Bataclan, a gunman shouted 'Allah Akbar' (God is great in Arabic) before firing. Terrified customers hid under tables.

Eyewitness Ben Grant, who was in a bar with his wife, said he counted 'six or seven bodies' on the floor.

He told the BBC: 'I was told people in cars had opened fire on the bar. There are lots of dead people. It's pretty horrific to be honest. I was at the back of the bar. I couldn't see anything.

'I heard gunshots. People dropped to the ground. We put a table over our heads to protect us. We were held up in the bar because there was a pile of bodies in front of us.'

Bodies litter restaurant floor after machine-gun wielding terrorists screaming 'Allahu Akbar' open fire on diners leaving 11 dead

By Stephanie Linning

At least eleven people were killed when machine gun-wielding terrorists attacked a central Paris restaurant in the first of a series of co-ordinated terror attacks across the French capital last night.

According to a woman who was in the Cambodian restaurant, a gunman shouted 'Allahu Akbar' (God is great in Arabic) before firing.

Terrified customers hid under tables as one diner described seeing a 'pile of bodies' on the ground.

Within hours, at least 140 were massacred in the city in the country's worst ever terror outrage.

Emergency services were called to the scene after armed terrorists fired at diners in a Paris restaurant

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Emergency services were called to the scene after armed terrorists fired at diners in a Paris restaurant

The horror started with Kalashnikov-wielding fanatics attacking Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge in the Bastille area of the city at around 9pm. Pictured, emergency services at the scene

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The horror started with Kalashnikov-wielding fanatics attacking Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge in the Bastille area of the city at around 9pm. Pictured, emergency services at the scene

Terrorists gunned down up to 120 at the Bactalan concert hall concert hall where around 100 people were held hostage. Gunfire was also heard in two bars in the 11th Arrondissement.

There were two further suicide attacks and a bombing near the Stade de France stadium where France and Germany were playing a friendly international football match.

Police said there were at least three dead in the attacks near the stadium, near two of the entrances and a McDonalds restaurant. He said the explosions went off simultaneously.

French President Francoise Hollande declared a national state of emergency following what he called 'unprecedented terror attacks', shut borders and deployed an extra 1,500 troops to Paris.

The ordeal ended only when police swooped on the Bactalan concert hall, killing the hostage-takers. In total, five suspected terrorists were killed across the city by French security forces.

BRITON WHO HELD WOMAN'S ARM AFTER SHE WAS FATALLY INJURED

Briton Charlotte Brehaut is one of roughly 40 diners who was inside the restaurant when the gunmen opened fired on diners in an attack that left 11 dead.

Miss Brehaut, who was out with a friend, said she was forced to flatten herself against the ground when the gunshots started - shattering the window to the Cambodian restaurant. 

She said there was a feeling of 'terror and panic' as the gunshots started at the eatery, which she said was in a 'young area' of the city and had been 'quite lively' on a Friday night.

Survivor: Briton Charlotte Brehaut is one of roughly 40 diners who was inside the restaurant

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Survivor: Briton Charlotte Brehaut is one of roughly 40 diners who was inside the restaurant

Speaking to CNN, she described how she held on to one woman who was fatally injured in the attack.

She said: 'All of a sudden we heard huge gunshots and there was lots of glass coming through the window. We ducked on to the floor with all of the other diners and we heard more gunshots coming through the window. Shards of glass were hitting people lying down on the floor.

'I was holding a woman's arm next to me. I realised she had been fatally wounded. She had been shot in the chest and there was blood all around her. And there were others who were wounded.'

Miss Brehaut said she 'didn't see anything' but that she believed there had been 'more than one gunman'.

She added: 'It also sounded like they stopped to reload - they stopped to reload and then there were more shots fired the second time around.'

The horror started with Kalashnikov-wielding fanatics attacking Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge in the Bastille area of the city at around 9pm.

Witness Ben Grant, who was in a bar with his wife, said he counted 'six or seven bodies' on the floor.

He told the BBC: 'I was told people in cars had opened fire on the bar. There are lots of dead people. It's pretty horrific to be honest. I was at the back of the bar. I couldn't see anything.

'I heard gunshots. People dropped to the ground. We put a table over our heads to protect us. We were held up in the bar because there was a pile of bodies in front of us.'

Police and other emergency services are at the scene, which is close to where the Charlie Hebdo attack happened in January.

Images posted online showed the cracked windows of what appeared to be the restaurant under attack.

Dozens of people were standing outside their cars on the junction opposite and the lights of police cars could be seen above them.

The chilling moment two explosions rang out at France's national stadium during football match when suicide bombers detonated nearby killing six

Chilling footage has emerged as at least one suicide bomber detonated explosives outside the Stade de France, causing thousand of fans to desperately try to flee the stands during the France and Germany game this evening.

Filmed by a fan, the video shows a French player in possession of the ball before a huge explosion can be heard in the background.

At least one terrorist is thought to have detonated a explosive device whilst trying to enter Gate J of the stadium, killing at least three fans.

Supporters of both France and Germany are being held in the stadium until they can be safely evacuated 

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Supporters of both France and Germany are being held in the stadium until they can be safely evacuated

Despite the terrifying explosion, the game continued before thousands of the terrified fans gathered on the pitch at the Stade de France.

Shortly after the full time whistle of Friday night's friendly game against Germany, fans were evacuated as further co-ordinated terrorist attacks were being carried out in the city.

The president of the French Football Federation later confirmed an explosion at Gate J of the national stadium but that the ground had been secured.

The sound of two explosions had been heard in the ground during the first-half, just hours after the German team were evacuated from their hotel amid a bomb scare.

Defiant French fans sing national anthem after attacks

 

Fan footage shows how the players continued to play football despite the horrific blast 

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Fan footage shows how the players continued to play football despite the horrific blast

Fans can be heard screaming in terror and confusion following the loud explosion outside the ground

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Fans can be heard screaming in terror and confusion following the loud explosion outside the ground

France and Germany supporters wait until they can be escorted safely away from the stadium 

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France and Germany supporters wait until they can be escorted safely away from the stadium

Hundreds of fans banded together, distressed at their situation as French police attempted to regain control.

The English FA, meanwhile, have confirmed that they will liaise with their French counterparts ahead of next Tuesday's friendly match at Wembley before any further announcements are made.

Les Bleus are due to face Roy Hodgson's men, but the encounter is now under a cloud of doubt after the alarming developments in the French capital.

Indeed, the prospect of the match being postponed looks likely given the horrific nature of the attacks.

France's year of terror: How Charlie Hebdo massacre sparked series of extremist attacks which have brought bloodshed to country

The horrific co-ordinated attacks carried out last night comes as the latest and most violent terrorist attack to target civilians on French soil.

From the Charlie Hebdo attack to the foiled lone gunman on the Thalys train, France has been repeatedly targeted by terrorists this year.

Twelve people were killed in January when two Islamic terrorists brandishing Kalashnikovs burst into the headquarters of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Twelve people were killed in January when two Islamic terrorists brandishing Kalashnikovs burst into the headquarters of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

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Twelve people were killed in January when two Islamic terrorists brandishing Kalashnikovs burst into the headquarters of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

 

The perpetrators, brother Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, were killed by police two days after police stormed a building where they were holding a hostage The perpetrators, brother Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, were killed by police two days after police stormed a building where they were holding a hostage

 

The perpetrators, brother Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, were killed by police two days after police stormed a building where they were holding a hostage

Among the slain was Stephane Charbonnier, the defiant editor whose satirical newspaper dared to poke fun at everything from religion to feminism.

Calmly leaving behind a scene resembling a war zone with bullet-riddled windows and the cries of the dying and wounded, the men ran on to the street outside – with the subsequent murder of an injured policeman caught on camera.

Witnesses said they heard the gunmen shouting 'We have avenged the Prophet Mohammed', 'God is Great' in Arabic and boasting 'We have killed Charlie Hebdo.'

The gunmen made their escape before stopping to kill the wounded officer, Ahmed Merabet, and then to hijack a car after their own vehicle was damaged in a crash.

Amedy Coulibaly killed a policewoman in Montrouge on January 8 and four hostages after seizing a Kosher supermarket in Paris

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Amedy Coulibaly killed a policewoman in Montrouge on January 8 and four hostages after seizing a Kosher supermarket in Paris

Amedy Coulibaly's accomplice and girlfriend Hayat Boumeddiene fled France and travelled to Syria

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Amedy Coulibaly's accomplice and girlfriend Hayat Boumeddiene fled France and travelled to Syria

Charlie Hebdo Editor Stéphane Charbonnier – one of the victims – spoke out fiercely against political correctness, saying: 'It should be as normal to criticise Islam as it is to criticise Jews or Catholics.'

The 47-year-old, who took over as editor in 2009, grew up in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, northern France and joined Charlie Hebdo in the early 1990s as a designer.

Jean 'Cabu' Cabut was another victim. The magazine's 76-year-old lead cartoonist was an almost legendary cultural figure in France.

The perpetrators, brother Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, were killed by police two days after police stormed a building where they were holding a hostage.

In June, a suspected Islamist beheaded his boss and tried to blow up a U.S-owned industrial gas plant in the suburbs of Lyon.

Terror fears continued to dog France, with officials confirming in July that they had prevented an attack on a senior French military official by arresting four people whose leader had links to jailed jihadists.

Ayoub el-Khazzani, who was reportedly radicalized while living in Spain, was arrested after the shooting when the Amsterdam-to-Paris train stopped at Arras station in northern France.

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Ayoub el-Khazzani, who was reportedly radicalized while living in Spain, was arrested after the shooting when the Amsterdam-to-Paris train stopped at Arras station in northern France.

Thousands of people poured on to the streets of Paris to show their solidarity after the horrific attack

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Thousands of people poured on to the streets of Paris to show their solidarity after the horrific attack

Spencer Stone (pictured), along with Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos and Chris Norman, was awarded the Legion d'Honneur after overpowering gunman Ayoub el-Khazzani

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Spencer Stone (pictured), along with Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos and Chris Norman, was awarded the Legion d'Honneur after overpowering gunman Ayoub el-Khazzani

One month later, a machine gun-toting attacker wounded three people on a high-speed train in France before he was overpowered by several passengers.

Ayoub el-Khazzani, who was reportedly radicalized while living in Spain, was arrested after the shooting when the Amsterdam-to-Paris train stopped at Arras station in northern France.

No one was killed but several people, including the U.S. citizen and French actor Jean-Hugues Anglade were wounded in the foiled attack.

PARIS ATROCITY IS LATEST IN LONG LINE OF HORRIFIC TERRORISM ATTACKS AROUND THE WORLD

The terror that unfolded in Paris has been described as the worst violence to hit France since the Second World War.

Terrorists have used different methods to inflict destruction around the world in recent years. Here are the most horrific attacks:

Omagh bomb

On August 15, 1998, 29 victims - who included a woman pregnant with twins - died after a dissident republican car bomb detonated in Omagh town centre on a busy Saturday afternoon.

It was the single bloodiest terrorist attack in the history of the Northern Ireland Troubles and came only months after the signing of the historic Good Friday Agreement.

More than 200 were injured when the 500lb car bomb, planted by the Real IRA, ripped through the Co Tyrone market town.

9/11

Nearly 3,000 people, including 67 Britons, were killed after Islamist extremists hijacked passenger jets and flew them into New York's World Trade Centre twin towers and the Pentagon in Washington DC on September 11, 2001.

The world watched in horror as the hijacked planes emerged from a clear blue sky to strike at the heart of one of the world's greatest cities.

Televised live around the globe to a shocked audience of billions, the 9/11 attacks were meticulously planned by Islamist fanatics to kill as many people and gain as much publicity as possible.

Bali

A total of 202 people, including 28 Britons, were killed on October 12, 2002 and more than 204 injured when the al Qaida-linked Jemaah Islamiyah group detonated bombs at two packed Bali nightspots.

During the attack three bombs detonated - a backpack carried by a suicide bomber and a car bomb which both devastated Paddy's Pub and the Sari Club opposite, followed by a third device outside the US consulate in Denpasar.

Various members of Jemaah Islamiyah were convicted in relation to the bombings. Three - Imam Samudra, Amrozi Nurhasyim and Huda bin Abdul Haq - were executed by firing squad in November 2008.

Madrid train bombings

The whole of Spain was in mourning when more than 190 people were killed in the Madrid train bombs on March 11, 2004.

The attacks took place exactly two-and-a-half years after September 11 and were Europe's worst terrorist atrocity since the 1988 Lockerbie plane bombing.

London-based Arabic language Al Quds newspaper said it received an e-mail from the Brigade of Abu Hafs al-Masri, who claimed its 'death squad' had penetrated 'one of the pillars of the crusader alliance'.

7/7

On July 7, 2005, 52 people were murdered and hundreds more injured when four suicide bombers attacked London's transport network.

Twenty-six died in the bombing at Russell Square on the Piccadilly line, six in the bombing at Edgware Road on the Circle line, seven in the bombing at Aldgate on the Circle line, and 13 in the bombing on the bus at Tavistock Square.

A fortnight later, another four would-be suicide bombers launched failed attacks on the Tube and a bus, leading police marksmen to kill innocent Brazilian Jean Charles de Menezes.

Mumbai

Often called India's 9/11, the Mumbai attacks in 2008 saw 10 gunmen blaze through the country's financial capital, killing more than 160 people.

Indian authorities took back control of Mumbai early on the morning on November 29 after a three-day siege across the city.

Security services and senior police in the UK have repeatedly highlighted the risk of a Mumbai-style roaming gun massacre, and earlier this year police carried out a simulated terror attack in the capital to test the emergency response to such a strike.

Lee Rigby

Fusilier Lee Rigby, 25, from Middleton in Greater Manchester, was killed outside barracks in Woolwich, south east London, on May 22, 2013 by two Islamic extremists.

The murder sparked shock across the country after the father-of-one was run over with a car and then hacked to death by British Muslim converts Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale.

Following an Old Bailey trial, Adebolajo was handed a whole-life prison term and Adebowale was jailed for a minimum of 45 years.

Charlie Hebdo

Paris was rocked by the Charlie Hebdo atrocity on January 7 this year, when 12 people were killed after gunmen stormed the offices of the satirical magazine.

The sense of panic heightened when there was a subsequent attack on a Kosher supermarket, and the incidents triggered worldwide outrage.

Since then there have been a number of more minor strikes or attempts in France. In one, three Americans and a Briton overpowered a heavily-armed gunman on a train from Amsterdam to Paris.

Sousse

Terror group Islamic State claimed responsibility for the Sousse attack in June, in which 30 Britons were among 38 tourists killed.

Gunman Seifeddine Rezgui opened fire on the holidaymakers on a beach in the Tunisian holiday resort.

Foreign Minister Tobias Ellwood has described the Sousse tragedy as the 'most significant terrorist attack' on Britons since July 7, 2005.

 

'We are all Parisians: From New York to New Zealand the world honours victims of the deadly terror attacks that brought war to the streets of Paris

  • Monuments including the One World Trade Centre building and the CN Tower lit up in blue, white and red
  • Hundreds of people leave flowers and light candles in vigils across the world, honouring the dead
  • Millions show their solidarity with the French capital on social media using hashtag #PrayForParis

People across the globe have been honouring the victims of last night's terror attacks in Paris with candlelit vigils, while monuments and buildings were lit up in the blue, white and red colours of the French Tricolore.

From New York to New Zealand, members of the public flocked to pay tribute to the innocent victims of the atrocities in the French capital, while millions more shared messages of solidarity on social media using hashtags such as #prayforParis and #JeSuisParis.

In Sydney, Australia, hundreds took to the streets waving French flags and holding banners proudly proclaiming 'We are all Parisians', and in Auckland, New Zealand, candles were placed alongside a poster reading 'Auckland With Paris'.

In Sydney, Australia, hundreds took to the streets waving French flags and holding banners proudly proclaiming 'We are all Parisians' as people across the world took part in vigils honouring those killed in last night's terror attacks in Paris

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In Sydney, Australia, hundreds took to the streets waving French flags and holding banners proudly proclaiming 'We are all Parisians' as people across the world took part in vigils honouring those killed in last night's terror attacks in Paris

In Auckland, New Zealand, candles were placed alongside a make-shift poster reading 'Auckland With Paris' as hundreds of people paid tribute to those killed

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In Auckland, New Zealand, candles were placed alongside a make-shift poster reading 'Auckland With Paris' as hundreds of people paid tribute to those killed

The One World Trade Centre was one of many buildings and monuments that were lit up with the colours of the French Tricolore flag

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The One World Trade Centre was one of many buildings and monuments that were lit up with the colours of the French Tricolore flag

 

Millions of people shared messages of solidarity on social media using hashtags such as #prayforParis and #JeSuisParis Praying for Paris

 

Millions of people shared messages of solidarity on social media using hashtags such as #prayforParis and #JeSuisParis

As the Eiffel Tower switched off its lights in mourning to those who lost their lives, notable buildings and towers around the world lit up in red, white and blue in a show of solidarity with the France.

The One World Trade Centre in New York, the CN Tower in Toronto, the Mexican Independence Angel and San Francisco's City Hall were all illuminated with red, white and blue lights in recognition of the tragedy.

And in Moscow - where many Russians are still mourning the loss of 224 holidaymakers killed when a plane flying from Egyptian resort Sharm el-Sheikh crashed in a suspected terror attack last month - huge bouquets of flowers were piled up outside the French Embassy.

Tower Bridge in London is due to be lit up in blue, white and red as the sun sets this evening, and a two-minute silence was held at the start of the Lord Mayor's show in the city today.

Opera House lit up in colours of French flag for terror victims

 

A woman mourns outside the Carillon bar where 14 people are thought to have been killed in one of last night's attacks

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A woman mourns outside the Carillon bar where 14 people are thought to have been killed in one of last night's attacks

Flowers and candles were also left outside the Carillon, as the entrance to the bar became something of a makeshift shrine

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Flowers and candles were also left outside the Carillon, as the entrance to the bar became something of a makeshift shrine

People queue up to leave flowers and candles outside Le Petit Cambodge restaurant in Paris, the scene of one of the attacks

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People queue up to leave flowers and candles outside Le Petit Cambodge restaurant in Paris, the scene of one of the attacks

People tie flowers to railings outside the Bataclan concert venue, which was stormed by gunmen last night

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People tie flowers to railings outside the Bataclan concert venue, which was stormed by gunmen last night

Celebrities, world leaders and civilians also united in solidarity with those in Paris in the aftermath of the worst atrocity in France in decades.

Miles away from the horror of the terror attacks, people were logging on to social media sites to share their shock at the events which unfolded on a Friday night in the French capital.

Hashtags including #PrayforParis, #JeSuisParis and #StandWithParis were flooding Twitter as people across the globe tried to process the trauma.

A sketch of the Eiffel Tower as a peace sign was circulating after it was posted on Instagram by users including Sir Elton John, One Direction singer Harry Styles, pop stars Justin Bieber and Britney Spears, and chef Jamie Oliver.

A woman places a lit candle outside the French embassy in Moscow this morning to pay tribute to the victims of the deadly attacks in Paris

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A woman places a lit candle outside the French embassy in Moscow this morning to pay tribute to the victims of the deadly attacks in Paris

A Russian man places a slice of bread on a plastic cup filled with vodka as a tribute to the Paris dead outside the embassy in Moscow

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A Russian man places a slice of bread on a plastic cup filled with vodka as a tribute to the Paris dead outside the embassy in Moscow

in Moscow - where many Russians are still mourning the loss of 224 holidaymakers killed when a plane flying from Egyptian resort Sharm el-Sheikh crashed in a suspected terror attack last month - huge bouquets of flowers were piled up outside the French Embassy

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in Moscow - where many Russians are still mourning the loss of 224 holidaymakers killed when a plane flying from Egyptian resort Sharm el-Sheikh crashed in a suspected terror attack last month - huge bouquets of flowers were piled up outside the French Embassy

A woman lays flowers outside the French embassy in Kiev, Ukraine. Candles and a handmade poster featuring lyrics from John Lennon's song Imagine had also been left there

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A woman lays flowers outside the French embassy in Kiev, Ukraine. Candles and a handmade poster featuring lyrics from John Lennon's song Imagine had also been left there

Two men place flowers in front of the French Embassy in Berlin, as the world mourned for the victims of the Paris attacks

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Two men place flowers in front of the French Embassy in Berlin, as the world mourned for the victims of the Paris attacks

A young couple hold each other tightly outside the French Embassy in Berlin, where many people had gathered this morning

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A young couple hold each other tightly outside the French Embassy in Berlin, where many people had gathered this morning

 

Floral tributes are placed on the steps of the French Embassy in Edinburgh The flag at the French Embassy in Edinburgh is tied with a black ribbon

A woman places a bouquet of flowers on the steps outside the French Embassy in Edinburgh today, while the building's Tricolore had been tied with a black ribbon

A woman light candles next to flowers and notes in tribute for the victims   outside the French Embassy in Madrid, Spain

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A woman light candles next to flowers and notes in tribute for the victims outside the French Embassy in Madrid, Spain

A woman arranges a bouquet of lillies, which had been wrapped in the colours of the Tricolore outside the French Embassy in Rome 

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A woman arranges a bouquet of lillies, which had been wrapped in the colours of the Tricolore outside the French Embassy in Rome

Notes left in Rome said: 'Today I am Parisian', and 'I am French, Italian, European', as well as the hashtag #prayforParis

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Notes left in Rome said: 'Today I am Parisian', and 'I am French, Italian, European', as well as the hashtag #prayforParis

The site credited the image to Jean Jullien, who captioned it 'Peace for Paris', while Instagram used it alongside a different version of the hashtag that became widely used after the Charlie Hebdo killings in January, posting #jesuisparis.

Sir Elton wrote: 'Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. -Martin Luther King Jr.'

David Beckham posted a picture on Instagram of the sun rising over Paris and wrote: 'As the sun rises in this beautiful city we remember the people that have died and the families that have lost loved ones... Our thoughts are with you all... PrayForParis.'

Notes reading, 'I am Paris' and flowers are seen outside French Embassy in Greece this morning

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Notes reading, 'I am Paris' and flowers are seen outside French Embassy in Greece this morning

Bouquets of flowers pile up outside the French Embassy in Washington DC in honour of those killed in Paris last night

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Bouquets of flowers pile up outside the French Embassy in Washington DC in honour of those killed in Paris last night

Members of the public, some holding candles, attend a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal last night, one of the banners reads 'I am French, I am not afraid'

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Members of the public, some holding candles, attend a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal last night, one of the banners reads 'I am French, I am not afraid'

Many of those at the Montreal vigil had painted their faces with the French flag in a show of support for those in Paris

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Many of those at the Montreal vigil had painted their faces with the French flag in a show of support for those in Paris

An Eiffel Tower peace sign had been drawn on the ground in New York's Union Square as French students gathered for a candlelit vigil

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An Eiffel Tower peace sign had been drawn on the ground in New York's Union Square as French students gathered for a candlelit vigil

In New York, people sat in pensive silence, or hugged one another as they tried to come to terms with last night's attacks

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In New York, people sat in pensive silence, or hugged one another as they tried to come to terms with last night's attacks

eople gather during a vigil in Aotea Square in Auckland, New Zealand, to remember victims of the Paris attacks

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eople gather during a vigil in Aotea Square in Auckland, New Zealand, to remember victims of the Paris attacks

Other images being shared include a black peace ribbon laid over the French flag, a pair of hands clasped together in prayer around the Eiffel Tower, and a montage of famous landmarks emblazoned in blue, white and red.

On Friday night the hashtag #PorteOuverte, which translates as Door Open, was being used to help people out in the city's streets to safety. The city remains in lockdown, with the country's schools and universities, which often open on Saturdays, ordered to remain closed.

Facebook enabled a safety check feature called Paris Terror Attacks to allow people to let their friends know they are safe, or to try to locate people they know in the city.

The Calgary Tower in Alberta, Canada was lit up with the colors of the French flag to show support and sympathy for those caught up in the Paris attacks

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The Calgary Tower in Alberta, Canada was lit up with the colors of the French flag to show support and sympathy for those caught up in the Paris attacks

The Sydney Opera House was also adorned with the colours of the French national flag as a show of support for France

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The Sydney Opera House was also adorned with the colours of the French national flag as a show of support for France

Auckland also joined in the show of solidarity, with the New Zealand city's Sky Tower lit up in red, white and blue

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Auckland also joined in the show of solidarity, with the New Zealand city's Sky Tower lit up in red, white and blue

The landmark CN Tower in Toronto, Canda, also glowed with the colours of the Tricolore last night. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said  it was too soon to say whether the deadly attacks in Paris would prompt him to reconsider his pledge to withdraw Canada from airstrikes against Isis militants

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The landmark CN Tower in Toronto, Canda, also glowed with the colours of the Tricolore last night. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said it was too soon to say whether the deadly attacks in Paris would prompt him to reconsider his pledge to withdraw Canada from airstrikes against Isis militants

San Francisco's City Hall also took on the colours of the French flag last night, as the city showed its support for Paris

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San Francisco's City Hall also took on the colours of the French flag last night, as the city showed its support for Paris

In Mexico, the Independence Angel square was illuminated with the colours of the French flag

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In Mexico, the Independence Angel square was illuminated with the colours of the French flag

Red, white and blue lights were also on display at the Taipei 101 building in Taiwan's capital following the attacks in France

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Red, white and blue lights were also on display at the Taipei 101 building in Taiwan's capital following the attacks in France

 

 

 

Britain last night sent out a second wave of bombing raids against ISIS in a conflict which is set to last for years to come as the Armed Forces battle to defeat the bloodthirsty terror group.

Seven precision-guided 500lb Paveway bombs were dropped on ISIS-controlled oil fields during two separate raids by Tornado jets flying out from RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus yesterday, destroying a vital source of ISIS's oil supply, thought to be worth millions of pounds.

The MoD said that the raids, launched less than an hour after MPs overwhelmingly authorised action, appeared to be 'successful' as military sources vowed to target 'the head of the snake'.

Two more Tornado jets flew out from Cyprus for more bombing raids against ISIS targets last night, and more strikes are expected today.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said, 'We are going after them,' but added that the campaign 'is not going to be quick', suggesting it will last for years rather than months as he hailed the crunch Commons vote which saw a majority of 174 MPs back 'action to tackle this menace'.

Mission: Typhoons, including the one pictured,  are among the extra fighter jets to have flown to RAF Akrotiri to join in air strikes in Syria

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Mission: Typhoons, including the one pictured,  are among the extra fighter jets to have flown to RAF Akrotiri to join in air strikes in Syria

Striking back: British warplanes carried out airstrikes in Syria early Thursday, hours after Parliament voted to authorize air attacks against Islamic State group targets there

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Striking back: British warplanes carried out airstrikes in Syria early Thursday, hours after Parliament voted to authorize air attacks against Islamic State group targets there

On a mission: An RAF Typhoon planes flies off from the RAF Akrotiri airbase in southern Cyprus

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On a mission: An RAF Typhoon planes flies off from the RAF Akrotiri airbase in southern Cyprus

Yesterday, six Eurofighter Typhoons touched down at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus to join the war against ISIS, after flying from RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland at around 8am.

Two Tornado warplanes also travelled from RAF Marham in Norfolk. The eight aircraft doubled the number of jets already stationed at the base.

The Typhoons - which are not equipped with precision Brimstone missiles - are likely to be deployed over Iraq to drop bombs on larger targets and free up other Tornado jets for Syria.

The Tornado GR4 aircraft offers a new capability for the coalition forces because the Brimstone missile it carries can track moving targets. This could include a jihadist on a motorbike travelling at 70mph and will be useful in places such as Raqqa, where targets have been difficult to isolate and catch.

Mr Cameron welcomed the start of operations, but warned the public that it would not end quickly. The Prime Minister said: 'We are going to need to be patient and persistent. This is going to take time. It is complex, it is difficult what we are asking our pilots to do, and our thoughts should be with them and their families.

'There will be strong support from our allies because they wanted us to join them in taking this action.

'There will be very strong support from Muslim countries, Gulf countries, that have asked to us to take part in this action as part of a process that will help to deliver the political and diplomatic change that we need in Syria as well,' added the Prime Minister, who is visiting Bulgaria today.

Raids: British Tornado bombers returning to their base at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus after flying air raids over ISIS targets in Syria yesterday; the jet on the left was missing one of its three Paveway missiles having dropped a bomb on an oil field

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Raids: British Tornado bombers returning to their base at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus after flying air raids over ISIS targets in Syria yesterday; the jet on the left was missing one of its three Paveway missiles having dropped a bomb on an oil field

Equipment: This image shows the bombs and laser guidance attached to a Tornado jet after it had dropped one Paveway bomb in Syria, along with chaff dispensers which help to avoid the plane being detected by radar systems

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Equipment: This image shows the bombs and laser guidance attached to a Tornado jet after it had dropped one Paveway bomb in Syria, along with chaff dispensers which help to avoid the plane being detected by radar systems

Ready for action: A Typhoon fighter jet stationed on the tarmac at the British airbase at Akrotiri, near Cyprus's second city of Limassol

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Ready for action: A Typhoon fighter jet stationed on the tarmac at the British airbase at Akrotiri, near Cyprus's second city of Limassol

Ready for a fight: One pilot indicates all things are in order whilst making final preparations in southern Cyprus

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Ready for a fight: One pilot indicates all things are in order whilst making final preparations in southern Cyprus

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A military source told the Evening Standard: 'We are going after the head of the snake, but it's also about going after its wallet'.

Mr Cameron boasted Britain is 'safer' after the House of Commons backed his proposal to extend military action in Syria by 397 votes to 223 - a majority of 174.

Some 66 Labour MPs defied their pacifist leader Jeremy Corbyn to back the Tory government, after Mr Cameron warned Britain had to strike at the heart of ISIS or 'wait for them to attack us'.

Within hours of the vote,Tornado GR4 jets and a Voyager refuelling tanker took off from RAF Marham, Norfolk for Cyprus. Six Typhoon jets later deployed from RAF Lossiemouth, Scotland, doubling the number of attack aircraft at the British base, which has already played a key role in Iraq strikes.

Targeting oil fields is intended to disrupt the source of the revenue which ISIS needs to fund its military operations as well as the running of its self-styled 'state' which straddles the borders of Syria and Iraq.

In Wednesday night's mission, RAF Tornado GR4s, supported by a Voyager air refuelling tanker and a Reaper drone carried out airstrikes against the Omar oilfield, 35 miles inside Syria's eastern border with Iraq, at an estimated cost of £300,000.

Paveway IV guided bombs worth £22,000 each were used to conduct strikes against six targets.

The MoD added: 'The Omar oilfield is one of the largest and most important to Daesh's financial operations, and represents over 10 per cent of their potential income from oil.

'Carefully selected elements of the oilfield infrastructure were targeted, ensuring the strikes will have a significant impact on Daesh's ability to extract the oil to fund their terrorism.' 

David Cameron says military action in Syria will take time

 

First blood: The Omar oil field (pictured via satellite) near Syria's border with Iraq was the first target to be struck by the RAF

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First blood: The Omar oil field (pictured via satellite) near Syria's border with Iraq was the first target to be struck by the RAF

Hit: The Omar oil field in eastern Syria was the first target to be bombed by RAF forces

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Hit: The Omar oil field in eastern Syria was the first target to be bombed by RAF forces

THE BRITISH MILITARY HARDWARE WHICH IS NOW BEING USED TO DEFEAT ISIS FASCISTS IN SYRIA

There are eight Tornado GR4 fighters previously on standby at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus, which were yesterday joined by two more from RAF Marham in Norfolk.

The two-man aircraft are 55ft long with a maximum speed of 1,490mph and a range of 870 miles, and cost £35,000 for every hour of flight.

Six Eurofighter Typhoons flew from RAF Lossiemouth in Moray, Scotland on Thursday to take part in the raids against ISIS or Syria.

The Typhoon holds just one person, with a 36ft wingspan, maximum speed of 1,550mph and range of 1,800 miles.

Both types of jet can be fitted by Paveway IV laser-guided bombs, which weigh 500lbs and cost £22,000 each.

The Tornado also uses Brimstone missiles, which cost £100,000 each and can travel at supersonic speeds, using radar and on-board navigation to find its target.

The manned aircraft are being supported by a fleet of ten Reaper drones, based in Kuwait but controlled by RAF personnel at the Waddington base in Lincolnshire.

The RAF has contributed a Rivet Joint spy plane to the allied coalition's headquarters in Qatar, working alongside countries such as the US and France.

Mr Fallon authorised the action minutes after the Commons vote which followed a marathon 10-and-a-half hour debate.

But he warned that the campaign would not be over quickly, telling BBC News: 'The American estimate of the campaign in Iraq, which began last year, was that it would last at least three years and we're not halfway through that yet.

'The operations there by the coalition have lasted just over a year and the Prime Minister has been pretty clear that this is going to be a long campaign to ensure that Daesh are thrown out of Iraq and that they are degraded and defeated in eastern Syria. This is not going to be quick.'

But he insisted Britain could not leave its national security to other airforces.

'What was really important about the vote last night was that it confirmed that Britain is a serious ally, that we've come to the aid of France who requested us to help with our RAF planes, that we've responded to the call of the United Nations on all members of the United Nations to do something to suppress this terrorism and to eradicate the safe haven that the Daesh has.

'So we're now responding to that. It's going to take time, but I'm very pleased now that right across Parliament last night there was a clear and decisive majority for action to tackle this menace – because it's a menace to us in the UK.'

But after William Hague suggested that the West would have to consider deploying 'small specialist ground forces' to defeat ISIS and end Syria's civil war, Mr Fallon added: 'It is not at all likely that our troops will be involved.'

Asked whether Britain was safer after the vote, he said: 'Yes. We were already involved in the fight against terrorism in Iraq and it made no sense to be able to attack targets one side of an artificial border that the terrorists themselves don't respect and not attack the other side.

'We were already in this fight, we have already seen our own citizens, holidaymakers slaughtered on a beach in Tunisia, one other British citizen killed in the attacks in Paris.'

The Ministry of Defence said in a statement yesterday that the strike would target 'the mainstay of Daesh's financial income', adding that RAF pilots ensured there were no civilians present when they launched their attacks.

'Following the vote in the House of Commons last night, Royal Air Force Tornado GR4 aircraft flew their first offensive operation against Daesh terrorist targets inside Syria,' the MoD said.

'The mainstay of Daesh's financial income is derived from exploitation of a number of oilfields that they hold. These are overwhelmingly located in Daesh's heartlands in eastern Syria.

'Several of these oilfields have already been effectively targeted by other coalition partners - RAF aircraft and precision weaponry are well suited to attacking, with low collateral risk, this type of target.

'Overnight, RAF Tornado GR4s, supported by a Voyager air refuelling tanker and a Reaper, and operating in conjunction with other coalition aircraft, employed Paveway IV guided bombs to conduct strikes against six targets within the extensive oilfield at Omar, 35 miles inside Syria's eastern border with Iraq.

'The Omar oilfield is one of the largest and most important to Daesh's financial operations, and represents over 10 per cent of their potential income from oil. Carefully selected elements of the oilfield infrastructure were targeted, ensuring the strikes will have a significant impact on Daesh's ability to extract the oil to fund their terrorism.

'Before our aircrew conducted their attacks, as is normal they used the aircraft's advanced sensors to confirm that no civilians were in the proximity of the targets, who might be placed at risk. Our initial analysis of the operation indicates that the strikes were successful.'

Flying in formation: RAF Typhoons arrive at the British airbase in Cyprus as further bombing missions are carried out in Syria

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Flying in formation: RAF Typhoons arrive at the British airbase in Cyprus as further bombing missions are carried out in Syria

New arrival: An RAF A400M military transport plane taxis on the runway after landing at RAF Akrotiri, southern Cyprus

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New arrival: An RAF A400M military transport plane taxis on the runway after landing at RAF Akrotiri, southern Cyprus

RAF Typhoon takes off for Syrian offensive from Lossiemouth

Syrian monitoring groups confirmed that oil fields at Omar, Tanak and Jafra in the eastern province of Deir el-Zour were hit overnight.

ISIS's control of oil fields in north-east Syria has provided them with £320million of revenue which they use to fund their terror activities in the Middle East.

The jihadist group is believed to work together with the Assad government - nominally its bitter enemy in the Syrian civil war - to maximise the profits it makes from its industrial operations.

State employees have allegedly been ordered to work at ISIS-held energy facilities to ensure that the country's infrastructure remains intact, with the terrorist factory bosses imposing a brutal regime.

Vladimir Putin recently accused the Turkish state of also buying oil from ISIS on an 'industrial scale' in the wake of the shooting down of a Russian plane over Turkey.

Just half an hour before the Commons vote, Mr Corbyn sat stony-faced as his shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn was cheered for a stirring speech in which he declared: 'We must now confront this evil.'

The speech is thought to have swayed wavering Labour MPs, helping the government to a majority much higher than the predicted 100. The Lib Dems and DUP backed the airstrikes, while the Scottish National Party claimed the government had not made the case for war.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell praised Mr Benn's oratory - but warned that the decision to bomb Syria could turn out to be as misguided as the conflict in Iraq.

'It reminded me of Tony Blair's speech taking us into the Iraq War,' he told the Today programme on BBC Radio 4. 'I'm always anxious that the greatest orators can lead us to the greatest mistakes.'

On a mission: An RAF Tornado arrives at the British base in Cyprus, ready for operations in Syria

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On a mission: An RAF Tornado arrives at the British base in Cyprus, ready for operations in Syria

Fighting back: ISIS targets have been hit in several RAF fighter jet attacks in north eastern Syria

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Fighting back: ISIS targets have been hit in several RAF fighter jet attacks in north eastern Syria

Up for a fight: RAF Typhoon aircraft arrive at RAF Akrotiri to begin operations in Syria

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Up for a fight: RAF Typhoon aircraft arrive at RAF Akrotiri to begin operations in Syria

HOW ISIS MAKES MILLIONS FROM THE OMAR OIL FIELD IN SYRIA

ISIS's control over 10 oil fields in its territory has been described by experts as the 'black gold' that allows the group to run a quasi-state as well as a global terror network.

The jihadists took over the Omar oil field, the biggest and best-quality in Syria, in July last year, wresting control of it from rival Islamists Al-Nusra.

At full capacity, the field is able to produce 75,000 barrels of oil a day - which would potentially produce revenues of more than £800million a year at current market prices. However, because of ISIS's relative lack of technical expertise and necessary equipment, the oil fields are much less productive than they used to be under Assad.

Before today's RAF air strikes, the Omar field had previously been targeted by the US air force, which estimated that ISIS was making up to £40million from selling the oil there - 10 per cent of its total oil revenues/

The terrorists sell the oil at the sites where it is pumped, handing it to traders who queue for hours to buy the fuel then take it to refineries or sell it on to smugglers.

The Prime Minister, who was thought to have shelved plans for a vote just a few weeks ago, wrote on Twitter after the vote: 'I believe the House has taken the right decision to keep the UK safe - military action in Syria as one part of a broader strategy.'

During a marathon debate lasting almost 11 hours, MPs lined up to say Britain must answer the pleas of allies including France and the United States.

They said the UK must join the fight against the group responsible for the Tunisian beach massacre, the downing of a Russian plane, the Paris atrocity last month and countless sickening beheadings of hostages, including Britons.

US President Barack Obama welcomed Britain's decision to join the coalition striking ISIS targets.

He said: 'The special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom is rooted in our shared values and mutual commitment to global peace, prosperity and security.

'Since the beginning of the counter-ISIL campaign the United Kingdom has been one of our most valued partners. ISIL is a global threat that must be defeated by a global response.'

French foreign minister Laurent Fabius added: 'I welcome the vote by the British House of Commons authorising an intensification of the United Kingdom's military efforts in the fight against Daesh by extending them to Syria.

'Through this vote and these actions, the UK is signalling its determination to combat Daesh. A fortnight after the November 13 attacks, this is a concrete demonstration of solidarity with our country.'

Speaking yesterday, Labour's Michael Dugher - one of 11 opposition frontbenchers to defy Jeremy Corbyn and vote for air strikes - called for the whole country to rally behind the military in the wake of the vote.

He said: 'Whatever our sincerely held, but different views yesterday, I hope we can all now get behind our brave armed forces.'

However, Conservative MP John Baron, a member of the foreign affairs select committee, warned that the Government does not have an 'exit strategy' to ensure that the conflict does not spiral out of control.

'There was a lack of a comprehensive strategy, including an exit strategy,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. 'We will be coming back and holding the Government to account.'

   

'They saw a man with a machine gun just opening fire': Drummer tells of the moment ISIS terrorists began shooting as band escapes concert atrocity - but other Americans are injured

  • California band were playing at Bataclan theater during Paris terror attack
  • Eagles of Death Metal had just taken to the stage when gunmen stormed in
  • Drummer describes seeing men with machine guns opening fire as he fled
  • Band are safe but they are still trying to locate members of their crew
  • State Department confirms Americans are among 300 injured last night
  • More than 100 people died at venue, which holds 1,500 and was sold out
  • Police raided theater at around midnight and freed the remaining hostages

The drummer of the American band who were playing in Paris when ISIS terrorists stormed in has described the moment he saw them open fire.

Julian Dorio, who is not a permanent member of the band but had joined them for their European tour, said he witnessed men with machine guns burst into the Bataclan concert hall last night.

More than 100 people were reported to have died at the venue as terrorists lined up music fans and killed them 'one by one' before detonating their suicide vests as French special forces stormed in.

Dorio's account emerged as the State Department confirmed on Saturday morning that Americans were among the estimated 300 people injured in Paris last night, including 80 who are in a critical condition.

Scroll down for video

Julian Dorio (pictured in a social media snap) was the drummer on stage with Eagles of Death Metal at the Bataclan theater last night where more than 100 people were killed by ISIS terrorists

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Julian Dorio (pictured in a social media snap) was the drummer on stage with Eagles of Death Metal at the Bataclan theater last night where more than 100 people were killed by ISIS terrorists

Dorio (seen in an earlier photo), who is originally from Atlanta, Georgia, told his brother Michael how he saw men with machine guns burst into the back of the theater and open fire before he crawled to safety

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Dorio (seen in an earlier photo), who is originally from Atlanta, Georgia, told his brother Michael how he saw men with machine guns burst into the back of the theater and open fire before he crawled to safety

The band had just come on to the stage (picturedwhen the attack started, with gunmen lining up victims and executing them before detonating suicide vests as police stormed in

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The band had just come on to the stage (picturedwhen the attack started, with gunmen lining up victims and executing them before detonating suicide vests as police stormed in

More than 100 people were counted dead at the central Paris venue, which holds about 1,500 people and was sold out. Above: An injured concert-goer makes a call after escaping from the carnage

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More than 100 people were counted dead at the central Paris venue, which holds about 1,500 people and was sold out. Above: An injured concert-goer makes a call after escaping from the carnage

Speaking to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Michael Dorio, the brother of 33-year-old Julian, related his account of what happened inside the Bataclan theater.

He said: 'They saw a man with a machine gun just opening fire. They heard more than they could see because of the stage lights.'

He said Dorio dived on to the floor of the stage with the rest of the band to avoid the gunshots, then crawled towards the back door of the venue before escaping into the street.

He said once they got outside they ran until they found a police station where they were taken to safety, before using a borrowed phone to call home.

All members of the band are safe according to messages from various family members on social media, including frontman Jesse Hughes' mother.

However, according to a post from the band themselves they are still searching for members of their crew, raising the possibility that there will be American casualties among the 127 killed last night. 

A spokesperson for Eagles of Death Metal wrote online: 'We are still currently trying to determine the safety and whereabouts of all our band and crew.

Rescue workers help a woman after the shooting outside the Bataclan theate

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Rescue workers help a woman after the shooting outside the Bataclan theate

French special forces storm Bataclan to free hostages

'Our thoughts are with all of the people involved in this tragic situation.'

The band's spokesperson later told Dailymail.com: 'Band members are safe. We are not making any comments and no one is speaking to press. We will issue a statement in the near future.'

More than 100 people have been counted dead at the central Paris venue, which holds about 1,500 people and was sold out. Many others were reported wounded.

It's believed dozens of American fans will have been at the gig to follow the popular rock band, originally from Palm Desert, California.

Michael Dorio, brother of EODM drummer Julian told Daily Mail Online he had an 'emotional' conversation with his sibling minutes after the attack.

The 37-year-old said: 'Julian is ok. He and the rest of the band are safe - they manage to escape out of the back of the theater so luckily they are okay.

'He was shaken up but his primary concern now is for the rest of the people still in there.

'He's with the band but some of the crew are still unaccounted for.

People are evacuated by bus, near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris

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People are evacuated by bus, near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris

A person is evacuated on a stretcher while receiving medical attention after the shooting at the Bataclan

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A person is evacuated on a stretcher while receiving medical attention after the shooting at the Bataclan

Police and emergency services gather outside Paris venue

'He didn't have his cell phone on him because that was with all of his stuff inside the theater.

'They all headed to a police station and he borrowed someone else's phone and called me - luckily he had memorized my number.

'He didn't really have a chance to go into detail about what happened.

'It was emotional but it was a brief conversation and he had to get down to business quickly because he wanted me to let everybody else know - family members, friends - that he was okay.

'So we didn't have a lot of time to talk emotionally.'

Michael said he was relieved his brother was safe and his thoughts and prayers were now with the victims of the attack.

David Hughes, the brother of band frontman Jesse Hughes, wrote on Facebook that Jesse is 'ok'.

'I spoke to him about an hour ago. The band is ok too. I hold out hope that as many people as possible make it out ok, as well. As the situation is still developing, I can not say much else.'

Hughes' mother Jo Ellen wrote on her Facebook page: 'Update just got word the rest of the band is ok. .. plz keep praying for those still being held and pray for the police.'

Minutes before the gig bassist Matt McJunkins posted a photo of the show just before the band was to go on stage.

He wrote: 'Parisians, see you in a few!'

Before the terror attack started, excited concertgoers posted snaps from inside the theater 

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Before the terror attack started, excited concertgoers posted snaps from inside the theater

French police stand near some of those who escaped from the theater before they were evacuated by bus from the Bataclan concert hall

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French police stand near some of those who escaped from the theater before they were evacuated by bus from the Bataclan concert hall

French President declares state of emergency; closes borders

Eagles of Death Metal is not a death metal band - the name is an inside joke.

Last month the group released their fourth album, Zipper Down.

The wife of drummer Julian Dorio told The Washington Post that Julian had called her to say everyone was safe.

‘He called to say that he loved me and he was safe,’ wife Emily said.

‘Everyone on stage was able to get off.’

While Dorio’s mother Mary Lou confirmed that the fate of several crew members was still unclear.

Julian was at a local police station, she said at around 6 p.m. eastern time.

French group Red Lemons posted to Facebook that the members of Eagles of Death Metal were safe.

They wrote: ‘For our american and english friends, a terrorist attack happened at the Eagles of death metal concert. We are safe. Mikel Ross, Eric McFadden we were with your mates Jesse, Tuesday, the other musicians outside, they’re safe too, they took a cab.’

Also a friend of opening band White Miles posted on that group's Facebook page that the group are OK. ‘Just heard from the band and they're safe,’ wrote Ben Gazey.

Witnesses said that someone shouted ‘Allahu Akbar, God is greatest,’ as the shooting started.

 

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