CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

Friday, February 3, 2017

(MILITARY ANALYSIS ON WINNING WARS) SUPER LASERS, TANKS 1000 MARINES ON BOARD A 400 mph AMPHIVIOUS CRAFT





If Rex Tillerson is not to become a wartime secretary of state like Colin Powell or Dean Rusk, he is going to have to speak to the Iranians, not with defiant declarations, but in a diplomatic dialogue.
Tillerson, of course, is on record as saying the Chinese should be blocked from visiting the half-dozen fortified islets they have built on rocks and reefs in the South China Sea.
A prediction: The Chinese will not be departing from their islands, and the Iranians will defy the U.S. threat against testing their missiles.There is an awful lot already on the foreign policy plate of the new president after only two weeks, as pro-Russian rebels in Ukraine are firing artillery again, and North Korea’s nuclear missile threat, which, unlike Iran’s, is real, has yet to be addressed.
High among the reasons that many supported Trump was his understanding that George W. Bush blundered horribly in launching an unprovoked and unnecessary war on Iraq.
Along with the 15-year war in Afghanistan and our wars in Libya, Syria and Yemen, our 21st-century U.S. Mideast wars have cost us trillions of dollars and thousands of dead. And they have produced a harvest of hatred of America that was exploited by al-Qaida and ISIS to recruit jihadists to murder and massacre Westerners.
Osama’s bin Laden’s greatest achievement was not to bring down the twin towers and kill 3,000 Americans, but to goad America into plunging headlong into the Middle East, a reckless and ruinous adventure that ended her post-Cold War global primacy.
Unlike the other candidates, Trump seemed to recognize this.
It was thought he would disengage us from these wars, not rattle a saber at an Iran that is three times the size of Iraq and has as its primary weapons supplier and partner Vladimir Putin’s Russia.
When Barack Obama drew his red line against Bashar Assad’s use of chemical weapons in Syria’s civil war, and Assad appeared to cross it, Obama discovered that his countrymen wanted no part of the war that his military action might bring on.
President Obama backed down — in humiliation.
Neither the Ayatollah Khamenei nor Trump appears to be in a mood to back away, especially now that the president has made the threat public.


The US president tweeted  that “Iran is playing with fire,” warning Tehran that he won’t be as “kind” as his predecessor, Barack Obama.
A landmark deal, brokered during Obama’s time in office, stated that Iran would dramatically curb its nuclear potential, but not completely, cutting the number of its centrifuges by two-thirds.
The deal also obliges Tehran to cap its uranium enrichment program below the level necessary for bomb-grade material, and involves Tehran agreeing to reduce its enriched uranium stockpile from around 10,000kg to 300kg for 15 years. In exchange, long-standing international sanctions against Tehran were lifted.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif also took to social media to respond to Trump’s allegations, saying that Iran was “unmoved” by US threats and “will never initiate war.”Laser weapons, silent subs and battleships that sail themselves: Experts reveal how navy fleets of the future will rule the waves

  • The Royal Navy in the UK has designed the Dreadnought 2050 concept, a high-tech trimaran vessel
  • USS Gerald R Ford, also known as CVN 78 is the first aircraft carrier to be designed using 3D computer modelling
  • Diesel-electric subs are considered to be the quietest in the world, leading Nato to nickname them 'black holes'
  • Other high-tech upgrades include laser weapons, drone boats and electromagnetic railguns fitted to carriers 
They are the ultimate symbol of military might, capable of providing a dominant presence in almost any region of the world where there is a nearby ocean.
But as technology has advanced, the hulking weaponry and armour of warships that have ruled the waves are having to change and adapt to these high-tech times.



B-52 set for 'Star Wars' laser weapons

B-52 set for 'Star Wars' weapons upgrade: Veteran bomber could get laser pods to shoot incoming missiles out of the sky




  • The US Air Force is developing defensive laser weapons for B-52 bomber 
  • The lasers could defend the jet by incinerating air-to-air or air-to-ground missiles
  • System could also jam the navigation system of approaching weapons 
It is one of the Air Force's longest serving bombers, having been in service since 1952.
Yet the B-52 bomber could soon get a radical overhaul, making it one of America's first military planes to have a laser weapon system.
Air Force bosses are experimenting with fitting external laser pods to the giant plane, allowing it to blast incoming missiles out of the sky or jam their navigation systems. 

The Boeing-manufactured bomber (pictured) has been in use since 1952 and is expected to remain operating until 2040, when it'll be replaced by the Northrop Grumman's B-21. Air Force bosses are experimenting with fitting external laser pods to the giant plane, allowing it to blast incoming missiles out of the sky or jam their navigation systems.
The Boeing-manufactured bomber (pictured) has been in use since 1952 and is expected to remain operating until 2040, when it'll be replaced by the Northrop Grumman's B-21. Air Force bosses are experimenting with fitting external laser pods to the giant plane, allowing it to blast incoming missiles out of the sky or jam their navigation systems.

LASER WEAPONS 'COMING SOON' 

Air Force bosses have boasted combat lasers will be fitted to fighters planes 'very soon' and have revealed a full scale prototype is being built.
'I believe we'll have a directed energy pod we can put on a fighter plane very soon,' Air Force General Hawk Carlisle claimed at the Air Force Association Air & Space conference last year in a presentation on what he called Fifth-Generation Warfare, according to Ars Technica.
'That day is a lot closer than I think a lot of people think it is.' The project is part of the Air Force Research Lab's five-year plan to create power, optics and lasers to help defend large bombers such as the B-52.
Air Force Chief Scientist Greg Zacharias told Scout Warrior: 'You can take out the target if you put the laser on the attacking weapon for a long enough period of time.' 
The researchers say the older, larger plane cold be perfect for laser weapons, and attaching an external pod would not affect its capabilities.
 Zacharias said the laser system would not be expected to work on stealthy aircraft such as F-15's or F-35's. 
Lasers use extreme heat and light to burn targets without creating a large explosion.
They work at very high speeds so they have an almost instant ability to destroy rapid targets and defend against enemies. 
Zacharias also said that if for some reason a pilot doesn't want to destroy an incoming missile but throw it off course, lasers could jam them. Lasers use extreme heat and light to burn targets without creating a large explosion. They work at very high speeds so they have an almost instant ability to destroy rapid targets and defend against enemies. The lasers could even be synchronized with telescopes to make them more precise for tracking and destroying attackers
Lasers use extreme heat and light to burn targets without creating a large explosion. They work at very high speeds so they have an almost instant ability to destroy rapid targets and defend against enemies. The lasers could even be synchronized with telescopes to make them more precise for tracking and destroying attackers
The lasers can be synchronized with telescopes to make them more precise for tracking and destroying attackers. 
Aircraft lasers for fighter jets such as the B-52 could eventually be applied to a wide range of uses such as air-to-air combat, air support, counter-drone, counter-boat and ground attacks. 
The Air Force Research Laboratory has said that they aim to have a plan in place for a laser weapon program by 2023. 
Aircraft lasers for fighter jets such as the B-52 could eventually be applied to a wide range of uses such as air-to-air combat, air support, counter-drone, counter-boat and ground attacks. The Air Force Research Laboratory has said that they aim to have a plan in place for a laser weapon program by 2023
Aircraft lasers for fighter jets such as the B-52 could eventually be applied to a wide range of uses such as air-to-air combat, air support, counter-drone, counter-boat and ground attacks. The Air Force Research Laboratory has said that they aim to have a plan in place for a laser weapon program by 2023
Ground level testing for a weapon called the High Energy Laser has been taking place for the last few years at White Sand Missile Range in New Mexico, with the first airborne tests set to take place by 2021. 
Air Force leaders told Scout Warrior that they plan to also integrate the lasers in large platforms such as C-17s and C-130s, and eventually on smaller jets such as the F-15. 

Boeing's new compact laser brings down drones

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But these laser weapons may not stick solely to aircraft platforms. 
The US Navy has plans to incorporate these lasers on US naval ships to help defend ships from drones and missiles. 
The lasers could also play a crucial role in defending against ballistic missiles.
According to Air Force experts, one of the clearest advantages of this laser technology is that instead of carrying a limited number of missiles on an aircraft, an energy based weapon such as a laser could fire thousand of shots using one gallon of jet fuel. 

BOEING B-52 FACTS AND FIGURES 

First flight: 1952
Length: 159 feet, 4 inches
Wingspan: 185 feet
Speed: 650 mph
Range: 8,800 miles without refueling
Armaments: 31,500 kilograms of ordnance, which can include bombs, mines and missiles
Crew: Five
Inventory: 58 active, 18 reserve
Cost: US$84 million
Source: US Air Force 

From drones to unmanned boats and laser weapons, experts at How It Works Magazine have revealed what fleets of the future will look like. This artist's impression shows a selection of some of the features that could make their way onto warships over the next decade
From drones to unmanned boats and laser weapons, experts at How It Works Magazine have revealed what fleets of the future will look like. This artist's impression shows a selection of some of the features that could make their way onto warships over the next decade
RETURN OF THE DREADNOUGHT 
The Royal Navy in the UK has been challenging young British scientists and engineers to design the fleet of the future. 
Their vision is the Dreadnought 2050 concept, a high-tech trimaran vessel built for speed, stability and efficiency. 
Named after the 1906 HMS Dreadnought, which was also a revolutionary vessel in its day, the sleek ship is almost fully automated, cutting today’s crews of 200 down to 50 or 100 members.
Renewable energy technology could also give the ship unlimited range, allowing it to sail the world without stopping to refuel, and advanced weapons will enable immense firepower in battle. 
While some of the technologies envisioned for the Dreadnought 2050 are not yet achievable, others could realistically be incorporated into future designs, lowering the cost and manpower needed for the next generation of warships. 

'groundskimmer' cargo plane to carry heavy loads that will fly just 10 FEET above the ground and sea



The US Navy has turned science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun (pictured) that can blow up targets in an instant. Although they won¿t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones and small boats

If the US Navy can turn science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun (pictured), they can use this sea skimmer as an ultrafast platform to engage enemy ships, planes, missiles and blow up targets in an instant. Although they won’t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, but super lasers deployed around 2018 like the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones.





  • Huge craft capable of carrying 500 tonnes of cargo in a single trip
  • Uses an effect known as ground effect to trap a air underneath its giant wing. This crafts can be made of composite materials like 
    Stavatti  unveiled designs for a new attack plane called the 'Machete' that consists of a new metal foam developed in conjunction with the US Department of Energy. The metal foam is lightweight and strong - and can stop bullets in much less space than traditional armor can
    the plane above that is lighter and stronger of which can be applied to the groundskimmer structure,and can absorve punishment from projectiles like warships made of steel, 
    Stavatti  unveiled designs for a new attack plane called the 'Machete' that consists of a new metal foam developed in conjunction with the US Department of Energy. The metal foam is lightweight and strong - and can stop bullets in much less space than traditional armor can
    He stressed the design has evolved and is more advanced than its early 2009 beginnings.
    'It's basically doubled in weight' to 30,000 pounds, Beskar explained, which is close to the same weight as an A-10.
    Adding the new metal foam into the design allows the plane to stop projectiles in a lesser amount of space than the traditional armor.
    'We could stop the bullet at a total thickness of less than an inch, while the indentation on the back was less than eight millimeters,' said Afsaneh Rabiei, an engineering professor at North Carolina State University, who tested the metal foam.
    'To put that in context, the [National Institute of Justice] standard allows up to 44 millimeters indentation in the back of an armor.'
    Meet the plane that could replace the A-10 Warthog



    The composite material is built like a sandwich: Between two pieces of aluminum, each just two millimeters thick, is a 25-millimeter-thick layer of the “foam,” actually a low-density, sponge-like composite of magnesium, silicon, and copper, and aluminum. And like a good sandwich, there’s no glue. The layers are held together by metallic bonding, the electrostatic attraction of negatively charged electrons and positively charged ions.The result is a material that’s 20 percent lighter than traditional fiberglass, which is commonly used on high-speed train cabs. That’s a big advantage when the goal is to move faster and more efficiently. Even better, it doesn’t come at the cost of a weaker train. “The outer shell is so stiff that you need no ribs inside,” says Dr. Thomas Hipke, head of lightweight construction at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology, which helped to design the prototype train cab. Peel tests of aluminum foam—in which force is applied to pull apart the layers of the material—destroy the foam interior instead of breaking the bonds between the layers, demonstrating the strength of the bonding.That strength matters a lot when you’re traveling at 150 to 200 mph, fast enough to keep up with a jet at takeoff. While crashes are rare, high-speed trains are regularly hit by small objects, which can cause trouble. “Aluminum foam has a very high and comfortable impact resistance, especially for small impacts like stones, bottles or just birds,” says Ralf Uhlig of Voith Engineering Services, which was involved in the construction of the prototype cab. Collisions with our feathered friends are relatively frequent and can pose real dangers to passengers. In 2013, a high-speed train en route to Beijing was forced to stop after a bird strike cracked the train’s exterior.The comparably cushy substance makes the inside of the train safer in a collision, too. Crash tests with human dummies have confirmed the material efficiently absorbs energy and protects passengers from “secondary impacts”—i.e., slamming into the wall or a seat back when the train lurches unexpectedly. Tests run by the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C. showed packing seat backs with aluminum foam reduced head injury values by 80 percent in an 8g impact.Aluminum foam was invented back in 1968, but the longstanding drawback for industrial applications has been the difficulty of shaping the material without relying on expensive tooling. Now, engineers at the Fraunhofer Institute and Voith Engineering Services have demonstrated aluminum foam surfaces can be formed economically using embossing tools: The contours of the material are set during the foaming process, rather than conventionally stretching the material around a blank of the desired shape. “We save approximately 60 percent on tool costs,” says Dr. Hipke. Train cabs assembled from aluminum foam are expected to be built within the next year. 

     
Russian researchers have revealed a radical new cargo plane that could radically change the way goods are shipped around the globe.
 The new 'groundskimmer' is a huge craft capable of carrying 500 tonnes of cargo in a single trip.
To do this, is uses an effect known as ground effect to trap a cushion of air underneath its giant wing.

The new 'groundskimmer' is a huge craft capable of carrying 500 tonnes of cargo in a single trip. To do this, is uses an effect known as ground effect to trap a cushion of air underneath its giant wing. Pictured, wind tunnel tests of the strange design
The new 'groundskimmer' is a huge craft capable of carrying 500 tonnes of cargo in a single trip. To do this, is uses an effect known as ground effect to trap a cushion of air underneath its giant wing. Pictured, wind tunnel tests of the strange design
'The layout combines functions of a wing with those of a body to take optimal advantage of the aircraft interior and to enhance the aerodynamic efficiency,' said Russia's Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute, which is developing the project. 
'The aircraft is intended for intercontinental transportation of large amounts of cargo — up to 500 tonnes, including transportation in approved containers.' 

HOW IT WORKS 

The strange craft is known as a Ground Effect Vehicle (GEV). 
It uses short, wide wings to trap a layer of air between the undersurface of the aircraft and the ground.
This creates vortices and downdraughts to generate more lift and less drag at very low altitudes - letting a plane carry heavy loads with far less fuel.
The radical design combines the wing and the fuselage of the aircraft, yet only reaches an altitude of between three and 12 m (10 and 40 ft) over water and land, while still being able to use existing runways.
It would be loaded with containers in compartments inside a wing and loaded via flap doors of fore-sections (leading edges) in the aircraft’s center, the scientists say.
As part of the concept research, a model has already created and tested by the Institute’s specialists in a subsonic wind tunnel. 
The strange craft is known as a Ground Effect Vehicle (GEV). 
The unique design  would be loaded with containers in compartments inside a wing and loaded via flap doors of fore-sections (leading edges) in the aircraft’s center, the scientists say
The unique design would be loaded with containers in compartments inside a wing and loaded via flap doors of fore-sections (leading edges) in the aircraft’s center, the scientists say
It uses short, wide wings to trap a layer of air between the undersurface of the aircraft and the ground.


  • In winning wars, boots on the ground is essential to occupy enemy territory. With a complement of 40 GXV-T with 4 to 6 infantry personnel each,  it can be used as a super  amphivious assault ship carrying troops aboard on special type vehicles like the one below.
  • US Army reveals radical new self-driving troop carrier: GXV-T concept can keep soldiers sealed inside and even automatically reconfigure its armour to 'bounce off' missile attacks. 


    The U.S. Army has been plagued with costly acquisition failures in recent decades, chief amongst them the Future Combat System (FCS) program. This $200 billion program initiated in 2000, the largest U.S. military acquisition program ever attempted, failed to produce results on a multitude of levels and was abandoned by 2009.
    The Armored Ground Vehicle (AGV) and Armored Gun System (AGS) programs also wasted tens of billions of dollars before being cancelled without achieving their intended goals. These programs were chiefly defeated by an overly bureaucratic Army acquisition system, and the fact that the Army had asked for far too much from the defense industry, demanding many new and unproven technological advancements.
    The FCS was the most expensive, most ambitious, and most transformative modernization program ever undertaken by the U.S. Army. It is often hypothesized that the U.S. experience in the first Gulf War of 1991 and in the NATO Kosovo intervention of 1999, led to the desire for a more rapidly deployable U.S. Army expeditionary force.
    FCS envisioned a highly mobile new Army, light enough to be air-deployable, yet lethal enough to survive on the modern battlefield. This survivability would be provided through the leveraging of new technologies, as well as superior command and control capabilities that would tie together all the various armed forces in a seamless information sharing and communications network.
    The Army set very high deployment goals as part of FCS, which would prove to be unattainable. The U.S. Army would strive to attain the ability to deploy a combat brigade anywhere in the world within 96 hours, a full division within 120 hours, and no less than five divisions in 30 days. Often referred to as “18+1+1”, FCS envisioned 20 different components integrated together to form the new warfighting system. Eighteen new manned and unmanned vehicles were planned, one computer network integrating all components, communications, information and services, and most importantly, the fighting soldier.
    Currently, the U.S. Army relies overwhelmingly on armored vehicle systems that were developed in the 1970s. These systems proved their worth over the last two decades. These “legacy” systems have been repeatedly improved since their introduction. These improvements have consisted of more powerful and efficient engines and drivetrain, modernized communications equipment, targeting and sensory upgrades, improved armor and improved weapons systems
    The U.S. Army currently fields the M1A2 SEP (System Enhancement Package) MBTs which are a significant improvement over older models. The latest improvement on the design is the SEPv.3 (version 3). The SEPv.3 achieves notable improvements in its fire control system, ballistics computer and thermal imaging sights.
    The SEPv.3 has been strengthened against IED attacks, and has additional layers of graphite coated depleted uranium added to its composite armor. It is considered one of the best protected MBTs in the world, despite the fact that it currently lacks an Active Protection System (APS).  It has been proposed that the M1A2 SEPv.3 can be retrofitted with the Israeli Trophy APS, or the Quick Kill APS system being developed by Raytheon.
  •  


This creates vortices and downdraughts to generate more lift and less drag at very low altitudes - letting a plane carry heavy loads with far less fuel.
 'The largest part of this aircraft’s flight takes place at an altitude of 3-12 m above water, ice or ground: these surfaces produce a screening effect which improves the lift/drag ratio considerably, leading to a decrease in fuel consumption and a significant increase in flight range,' the researchers say.
The aircraft will use liquefied natural gas, which has a higher energy efficiency and lower noxious emissions compared to aviation kerosene. 
The US Navy has turned science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun (pictured) that can blow up targets in an instant. Although they won’t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones and small boats
Right now, there is an immediate use of these crafts to patrol the Black Sea. The treaty can be preserved with this rapid deployment and not to depend on slow capital ships for defense of the Black Sea, or if not only to reduce the presence of the 6th Fleet in preventing further incursions of Russian warships on NATO nations.  


The length of time that US ships patrol the Black Sea could be extended from the current operating level of about four months, Navy staff director Vice Adm. James Foggo told everybody at the Defense Forum in Washington, DC. The US is thus sending a message to Europe that it could augment its naval presence in the Black Sea. The negative impact of this decision is hard to miss as most Europeans believe that America has done a poor job as a world leader since the 1991 Soviet breakup.
In keeping with the 1936 Montreux Convention, US naval ships cannot stay in the Black Sea more than 21 days, but it looks like the Pentagon could disregard these limitations. NATO, meanwhile, is equally ready to contribute to this dangerous escalation. During their October 26-27 meeting in Brussels, the defense ministers of the 28 member —states disused measures to boost the alliance’s presence in the Black Sea region. US The US Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples is operationally organized into six task groups consisting of carrier ships, amphibious forces, landing forces, logistics forces and special operations units that are present in the Mediterranean for a period of 6 to 8 months.
The Sixth Fleet has at its heart a task force of one or two aircraft carriers, two missile cruisers, sixteen frigates and destroyers in addition to submarines, landing ships, Marine units and bases in Italy, Spain, France, Greece, Turkey and other European countries. The Fleet’s area of responsibility includes the Mediterranean and Black Seas, part of the Atlantic Ocean and the coast of Africa (Gulf of Guinea). The Sixth Fleet’s command and control ship, the USS Mount Whitney, bristles with the most sophisticated communications and surveillance equipment ensuring effective command of the Fleet’s Air Force and Marine units.

US naval ships with the Aegis integrated naval weapons system  on board are part of the US missile defense system and can weaken the impact of Russia’s retaliatory missile strike. In addition, there is a number of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers armed with Tomahawk cruise missiles regularly patrolling waters off Russia’s Crimean peninsula.
The Royal Navy in the UK has been challenging young British scientists and engineers to design the fleet of the future. Their vision is the Dreadnought 2050 concept (illustrated), a high-tech trimaran vessel built for speed, stability and efficiency. It features reinforced armour, 3D-printers, a flight deck for drones and helicopters and hypersonic missiles. There is even a holographic command centre.
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS WITH ELECTROMAGNETIC CATAPULTS
Aircraft carriers are often the capital ships of a nation’s navy, helping the air and maritime forces work together to project air power worldwide. 
The US Navy currently has ten enormous nuclear-powered supercarriers in its fleet but a long-overdue upgrade is on its way. 
The first of the new Ford-class carriers, the USS Gerald R Ford, is currently undergoing the final phases of construction and testing, and is set to join the Navy’s fleet in 2016.
The USS Gerald R Ford, also known as CVN 78, will be similar in size to its predecessor Nimitz-class ships, but as the first aircraft carrier to be completely designed using 3D computer modelling, it will be lighter, cheaper and more powerful. Increased automation will mean up to 900 fewer crew members will be needed on board and for the first time, air conditioning will be available throughout the ship (pictured)
The USS Gerald R Ford, also known as CVN 78, will be similar in size to its predecessor Nimitz-class ships, but as the first aircraft carrier to be completely designed using 3D computer modelling, it will be lighter, cheaper and more powerful. Increased automation will mean up to 900 fewer crew members will be needed on board and for the first time, air conditioning will be available throughout the ship (pictured)
This graphic details the different types of ships in a typical navy fleet, from the aircraft carrier at the top to the amphibious assault ship at the bottom. All of these warships are getting high-tech upgrades and advanced specifications to bring them into the 21st century
This graphic details the different types of ships in a typical navy fleet, from the aircraft carrier at the top to the amphibious assault ship at the bottom. All of these warships are getting high-tech upgrades and advanced specifications to bring them into the 21st century

The future of warships features in the latest issue of How it Works magazine (front cover pictured)
The USS Gerald R Ford, also known as CVN 78, will be similar in size to its predecessor Nimitz-class ships, but as the first aircraft carrier to be completely designed using 3D computer modelling, it will be lighter, cheaper and more powerful. 
Increased automation will mean between 500 to 900 fewer crew members will be needed on board and for the first time, air conditioning will be available throughout the ship, making life at sea more comfortable. 
The carrier can hold up to 90 aircraft at a time, but instead of launching them using the steam-powered catapults found on modern day ships, an electromagnetic launch system will be used to fire them into the air. 
This works a lot like a railgun but uses an aircraft as the projectile.
SILENT SUBMARINES
They may be hard to miss when on dry land, but Improved Kilo-class submarines are able to travel unseen through the depths. 
These diesel-electric subs are considered to be the quietest in the world, leading Nato to nickname them 'black holes' due to their low noise and visibility. 
Despite weighing around 4,000 tons, the subs can reach speeds of 37 kilometres (23 miles) per hour, and can patrol for up to 45 days at a time.
Once they have snuck up on the enemy, eight infrared-guided surface-to-air missiles can then be fired at targets above the water, or computer-controlled torpedoes can be deployed beneath the waves. 
The submarine’s array of sensors mean that it can detect enemy vessels at a range three to four times greater than it can be detected itself. 
This surveillance data can then be used by the onboard computer to calculate firing parameters and recommend manoeuvres and weapon deployment. 
The six stealthy subs in this class will be patrolling the Black Sea by the end of 2016.
DRONE BOATS 
With aerial drones already being used in military combat, it was only a matter of time before unmanned boats came onto the scene. 
The Royal Navy currently has a fleet of modified rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) in development that will be able to perform complex surveillance and reconnaissance missions, without putting sailors in harm’s way. 
Using an arsenal of sensors, including a navigation radar, a 360-degree infrared camera array and a laser range finder, the vessels will be able to operate autonomously while avoiding collisions, and are expected to provide added protection for the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers once they enter service. 
The US Navy is also developing similar unmanned vessels that will be able to swarm and attack enemy targets, and the US defence agency DARPA even has plans for an ‘Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vehicle’ that will be able to use artificial intelligence and sensors to hunt for enemy submarines.
The Royal Navy currently has a fleet of modified rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) in development that will be able to perform complex surveillance and reconnaissance missions (pictured). Using sensors, including a navigation radar, a 360-degree infrared camera array and a laser range finder, the vessels will be able to operate autonomously while avoiding collisions
The Royal Navy currently has a fleet of modified rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) in development that will be able to perform complex surveillance and reconnaissance missions (pictured). Using sensors, including a navigation radar, a 360-degree infrared camera array and a laser range finder, the vessels will be able to operate autonomously while avoiding collisions
LASER WEAPONS
The US Navy has turned science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun that can blow up targets in an instant. 
Although they won’t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones and small boats. 
The weapon, which has been installed on board the USS Ponce, consists of six commercial welding lasers joined together, and can deliver 30 million times as much power as a hand-held laser pointer. 
It is operated using an Xbox-style controller and can be used to simply disable a target’s sensors and instruments, or destroy it completely. 
As well as improved accuracy, another big advantage of LaWS is its cost, as the price of firing the laser is just 59 cents (39 pence) per shot, compared to the $2 million (£1.3 million) needed for a traditional missile. 
The US Navy has turned science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun (pictured) that can blow up targets in an instant. Although they won¿t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones and small boats
The US Navy has turned science fiction into reality by developing a real-life laser gun (pictured) that can blow up targets in an instant. Although they won’t be using it to fight space aliens any time soon, the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) has been successfully tested at sea, proving that it is capable of blowing up moving targets on aerial drones and small boats

Right now, there is an immediate use of these crafts to patrol the Black Sea. The treaty can be preserved with this rapid deployment and not to depend on slow capital ships for defense of the Black Sea, or if not only to reduce the presence of the 6th Fleet in preventing further incursions of Russian warships on NATO nations.  


The length of time that US ships patrol the Black Sea could be extended from the current operating level of about four months, Navy staff director Vice Adm. James Foggo told everybody at the Defense Forum in Washington, DC. The US is thus sending a message to Europe that it could augment its naval presence in the Black Sea. The negative impact of this decision is hard to miss as most Europeans believe that America has done a poor job as a world leader since the 1991 Soviet breakup.
In keeping with the 1936 Montreux Convention, US naval ships cannot stay in the Black Sea more than 21 days, but it looks like the Pentagon could disregard these limitations. NATO, meanwhile, is equally ready to contribute to this dangerous escalation. During their October 26-27 meeting in Brussels, the defense ministers of the 28 member —states disused measures to boost the alliance’s presence in the Black Sea region. US The US Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples is operationally organized into six task groups consisting of carrier ships, amphibious forces, landing forces, logistics forces and special operations units that are present in the Mediterranean for a period of 6 to 8 months.
The Sixth Fleet has at its heart a task force of one or two aircraft carriers, two missile cruisers, sixteen frigates and destroyers in addition to submarines, landing ships, Marine units and bases in Italy, Spain, France, Greece, Turkey and other European countries. The Fleet’s area of responsibility includes the Mediterranean and Black Seas, part of the Atlantic Ocean and the coast of Africa (Gulf of Guinea). The Sixth Fleet’s command and control ship, the USS Mount Whitney, bristles with the most sophisticated communications and surveillance equipment ensuring effective command of the Fleet’s Air Force and Marine units.
US naval ships with the Aegis integrated naval weapons system  on board are part of the US missile defense system and can weaken the impact of Russia’s retaliatory missile strike. In addition, there is a number of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers armed with Tomahawk cruise missiles regularly patrolling waters off Russia’s Crimean peninsula.





Both the United States and NATO are seeking to expand their presence in the Black Sea following the 2014 reunification of Crimea with the Russian Federation, a move that NATO sees as a violation of international law. Moscow maintains the legitimacy of the 2014 Crimea’s popular referendum to rejoin Russia.

Trump far more aggressive with Russia than Obama, no guts to stand up to congress after all




‘Vicious circle’: Moscow warns NATO Black Sea buildup & increased spending may lead to new Cold War
Moscow will take “all necessary measures” to protect its national interests in the Black Sea, Russia’s envoy to NATO has said, warning the alliance risks ushering in a vicious new Cold War with its significant spending and military build up in the region.
Part of the strategy adopted at the meeting was to increase NATO’s naval presence in the Black Sea to complement its “regional posture in the air and on land.”
“We will have increased presence in the Black Sea, but it will be measured, it will be defensive and it will in no way aim at provoking any conflict or escalating tensions, but it is one element in a broader adaptation of NATO defense and deterrence to a more demanding and challenging security environment including in the Black Sea region,” Stoltenberg said answering a question from a reporter from St. Petersburg.
Responding to the latest move of the military bloc’s expansionist strategy, the Russian envoy to NATO, Aleksandr Grushko, said Moscow would carefully analyze the developments and issue an appropriate response.
“All these decisions will be subject of thorough analysis… And, undoubtedly, we will take all necessary measures to properly safeguard Russia’s national interests in this region,” Grushko said.
In addition to the Black Sea buildup, the Russian envoy also warned that the agreed increase of contributions to NATO’s budget might lead to a new arms race.
Speaking on Thursday Stoltenberg stressed that NATO’s continuous adaptation to security requirements required a “fairer burden-sharing among Allies,” something which the US has been insisting on. He noted that defense spending in 2016 increased in real terms by 3.8 percentIn 2014, NATO members reaffirmed their commitment to spend 2 percent of their economic output on defense and 20 percent of that amount “on major new equipment, including related research and development.”
“The danger lies in the fact that [NATO] is expected to increase not only the spending but also significantly increase the purchase of arms,” Grushko noted. “If these plans will be implemented, we may find ourselves in the situation of a Cold War, when the military planning, aimed at countering a ‘large enemy’ would generate respective policies.”
Right now, the envoy warned, NATO is in danger of being stuck in a “vicious circle” of an arms buildup “from which it will be very difficult to get out.”
The history of the Cold War, Grushko noted, should have taught the alliance that military planning and policies on their side always triggered a response from the Soviet Union, until confrontation between the two blocks “led to a situation where it became clear that the price of peace in the Cold War turned out to be unsustainable for everyone.”
Moscow cannot view NATO as a potential partner until European states figure out where their true national and security interests lie, the envoy noted.
“While NATO maintains its stance not to cooperate with Russia, adopted at the summit in Warsaw, we cannot view the Alliance as a potential partner,” Grushko said, warning that Moscow may soon lose interest in pursuing contacts if the alliance “does not promote the restoration of bilateral cooperation.”
On 1 April 2014, NATO unanimously decided to suspend practical co-operation with the Russian Federation, in response to the Ukraine crisis. It then renewed this position last summer during the Warsaw summit.
In Warsaw, NATO members also agreed to boost its NATO presence in Eastern Europe and the Baltic region to levels not seen since the Cold War – posting four rotating multinational battalions to Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland.
In January, 2,800 pieces of US military hardware, including Abrams tanks, Paladin artillery, and Bradley fighting vehicles, and 4,000 troops arrived in Europe as part of the operation. Just last week, the alliance concluded their Sea Shield 2017 naval drills with the participation of seven NATO member states and Ukraine in the Black Sea.
Earlier on Thursday, addressing FSB officials, President Vladimir Putin accused NATO of meddling in Russian affairs and trying to provoke a conflict. NATO with its “newly-declared official mission to deter Russia” poses a threat to global security, Putin said.
“This is the goal behind the expansion of this military bloc. It happened before, but now they have found a new justification which they believe to be serious,” the president added.
“They are provoking us constantly and are trying to draw us into confrontation,” the Russian leader stated, adding that NATO states are continuing their attempts to “interfere in our internal affairs in a bid to destabilize the social and political situation in Russia itself.











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