CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS

Saturday, April 15, 2017



COULD THESE MISSLES HIT THE WESTERN US


North Korean soldiers carry flags as they pass an image of Kim Il Sung as they take part in a parade in capital Pyongyang
North Korean soldiers carry flags as they pass an image of Kim Il Sung as they take part in a parade in capital Pyongyang

Thousands of troops took part in the parade on a day to mark what would have been the 105th birthday of the country's founder, Kim Il Sung
Thousands of troops took part in the parade on a day to mark what would have been the 105th birthday of the country's founder, Kim Il Sung

North Korea has warned that Donald Trump's 'troublemaking' and 'aggressive' tweets have pushed the world to the brink of thermo-nuclear war
North Korea has warned that Donald Trump's 'troublemaking' and 'aggressive' tweets have pushed the world to the brink of thermo-nuclear war

Commandoes wearing camouflage gear were on parade as soldiers yelled out 'long live' to celebrate the 105th anniversary of Kim Jong-un's grandfather's birthday


Commandoes wearing camouflage gear were on parade as soldiers yelled out 'long live' to celebrate the 105th anniversary of Kim Jong-un's grandfather's birthdayA total of 56 missiles of 10 different types were displayed, culminating in enormous rockets on articulated trailers and on 16-wheeler vehicles.Single-engine propeller-powered planes flew in a 105 formation overhead.Unlike previous parades attended by Kim, there did not appear to be a senior Chinese official in attendance, Reuters observed. China is North Korea's lone major ally, but has spoken out against its missile and nuclear tests and has supported UN sanctions. 




  • U.S. Army troops performed military defense exercises near the border of North and South Korea in Paju on Saturday
  • President Trump sent an aircraft carrier-led strike group to the Korean Peninsula as US officials feared the Kim Jong-un would mark its national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test
  • The North Korean leader vowed to detonate an 'annihilating strike' if Washington attacks, during the country's Day of the Sun parade
  • The regime has accused Trump of provoking armed conflict and issued multiple warnings of retaliation 
  • On Wednesday the U.S. launched a surprise military exercise at the Kadena Air Base in Japan with jets in the 18th wing arsenal


The United States is flexing its military muscle in South Korea amid growing tensions with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un after the dictator vowed to launch an 'annihilating strike' if Washington attacks, during the country's Day of the Sun parade.President Trump sent an aircraft carrier-led strike group to the Korean Peninsula as US officials feared the dictator would mark the national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test, since the country has used previous holidays to showcase its military prowess.The socialist state celebrated the 105th anniversary of its founder Kim Il-Sung's birth, where Jong-un threatened to defeat enemies with 'nuclear justice.' U.S. Army troops and Air Force conducted military exercises on Saturday near the border between the two countries in Paju. On Wednesday the United States launched a surprise military exercise at the Kadena Air Base in Japan, with HH-60 Pave Hawks, F-15 Eagles, E-3 Sentries and KC-135 Stratotankers, Fox News reported. 

  • North Korea has been secretly training elite special forces to kidnap Westerners from South Korea and hold them hostage in the event of any conflict.
If the United States attacks the so-called Hermit Kingdom, snatch squads armed with deadly nerve agents are poised to slip past South Korean border checkpoints to grab diplomats, tourists and foreign businessmen.In an exclusive interview, Ung-gil Lee, who defected to South Korea after serving for six years in one of these clandestine units, told The Mail on Sunday: ‘The best case [for his old unit] would be to round them up and take them north, but if not they will take the foreigners hostage in South Korea.If the US attacks North Korea, the country's elite special forces will kidnap Westerners from South Korea and hold them hostage, a defector has revealed
If the US attacks North Korea, the country's elite special forces will kidnap Westerners from South Korea and hold them hostage, a defector has revealed
‘But they will all be killed, come what may – this goes hand in hand with assassination.’
North Korea has a history of abducting foreigners. In the 1970s, South Korea’s leading movie star Choi Eun-hee and foremost director Shin Sang-ok were held as prisoners to make films for the brutal totalitarian regime until they escaped seven years later.
The Mail on Sunday’s revelation of the terror units comes as tensions rise over North Korea’s growing nuclear strength. US President Donald Trump pledged to ‘take care’ of the issue following his surprise cruise missile attack on Syria over its use of chemical weapons.
Trump has sent a naval strike group, including an aircraft carrier and submarines, to the region. Kim Jong Un, the North Korean dictator, responded by warning he is ‘ready to react to any mode of war desired by the US’.
Ung-gil Lee defected to South Korea after serving six years in the 11th Storm Corps and was recruited by his uncle, who was a senior official. He endured one year of brainwashing 're-education'
Ung-gil Lee defected to South Korea after serving six years in the 11th Storm Corps and was recruited by his uncle, who was a senior official. He endured one year of brainwashing 're-education'Lee, a former corporal in the 11th Storm Corps, says his former comrades have been trained to carry out Islamic State-style terror attacks. The 37-year-old, who now works as a financial adviser in Seoul after defecting from the repressive regime in 2006, warns that if attacked, Kim Jong Un will respond very differently from Syria’s President Bashar Assad: ‘He is going to fight back and use all retaliatory measures. Unless Trump thinks he can get rid of him, he must not carry out an attack.’Lee was recruited to join North Korea’s infamous special forces aged 17. Following one year of brainwashing ‘re-education’, he spent five years training as a communications officer.The nation is thought to have 200,000 men and women in the world’s biggest special forces, with 140,000 in infantry groups and 60,000 in Lee’s 11th Storm Corps. They are renowned for extreme training that includes boxing fights before dinner every night, punching trees and swimming in freezing seas. Elite units are trained to infiltrate South Korea by air, sea and through a network of tunnels built by forced labourers.His group was also taught to memorise details about mobile phone systems – and were armed with nerve agents along with conventional weapons. Pictured, the US forces in South Korea
His group was also taught to memorise details about mobile phone systems – and were armed with nerve agents along with conventional weapons. Pictured, the US forces in South KoreaLee says he was part of a 100-strong land and air group selected for raids on the South to destroy infrastructure, disrupt roads and ports, and kidnap foreigners.‘We would sneak into the South, change our clothing, go into areas where there are lots of foreigners and capture some of them. We memorised locations, phone numbers and the car number plates of major embassies.’His group was also taught to memorise details about mobile phone systems – and were armed with nerve agents along with conventional weapons. ‘I carried neostigmine bromide and potassium cyanide. Those exposed to these drugs die of heart attacks. These were carried for attacks or else for us to commit suicide.’Neostigmine bromide is five times more toxic than potassium cyanide. North Korean agents have previously used tiny guns or pens loaded with the drug, which has been detected in the killing of a South Korean diplomat and the assassination attempt of a leading dissident.Lee used to go on raids in South Korea with his 100-strong land and air group. They destroyed infrastructure, disrupted roads and kidnapped foreigners. Pictured, a nuclear test site in North Korea
Lee used to go on raids in South Korea with his 100-strong land and air group. They destroyed infrastructure, disrupted roads and kidnapped foreigners. Pictured, a nuclear test site in North Korea
‘These were suicide missions,’ says Lee of his excursions into the South. ‘Obviously we were supposed to go back but, if not, we were told we must kill ourselves.’
There are several of these squads, each assigned a different region of South Korea. Lee’s unit – which he says still exists, although its number changes frequently to avoid detection – focused on Pohang, a port of half a million people.
Twice a year they would have sessions to hone training, and every other year hold a major exercise in an area in North Korea most similar to their target city. Prizes of party membership, which entitles holders to perks and privileges, were offered to the most tenacious operatives.

US soldiers prepare for a military exercise near the border between South and North Korea on April 15 in Paju, South Korea
US Army soldiers with M1A2 tanks participate in a defence exercise conducted to simulate a response to a possible attack from North Korea at the Mugeon-ri drill field
US Army soldiers with M1A2 tanks participate in a defence exercise conducted to simulate a response to a possible attack from North Korea at the Mugeon-ri drill field
Tensions between the US and North Korea have been mounting in recent weeks, and yesterday Pyongyang issued a series of menacing threats to 'ravage' US troops and 'go to war if they choose'
Tensions between the US and North Korea have been mounting in recent weeks, and yesterday Pyongyang issued a series of menacing threats to 'ravage' US troops and 'go to war if they choose'
President Trump sent an aircraft carrier-led strike group to the Korean Peninsula as US officials feared the Kim Jong-un would mark its national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test
President Trump sent an aircraft carrier-led strike group to the Korean Peninsula as US officials feared the Kim Jong-un would mark its national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons testNorth Korea has showed off its strength by testing two nuclear bombs and multiple missile tests in the last year. On Saturday he told the packed-out square: 'If the United States wages reckless provocation against us, our revolutionary power will instantly counter with annihilating strike, and we will respond to full-out war with full-out war and to nuclear war with our style of nuclear strike warfare.' Submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) were also among the sophisticated military hardware on show for the first time, indicating an improving technological capability that could help it evade anti-missile systems.  A total of 56 missiles of 10 different types were displayed, culminating in enormous rockets on articulated trailers and on 16-wheeler vehicles.Single-engine propeller-powered planes flew in a 105 formation overhead.Unlike previous parades attended by Kim, there did not appear to be a senior Chinese official in attendance, Reuters observed. 
Trump met with Chinese President Xi Jinping last week to put pressure on the leader to help ease tensions with North Korea or else the U.S. will take action alone.China is North Korea's lone major ally, but has spoken out against its missile and nuclear tests and has supported UN sanctions. China yesterday again called for talks to defuse the escalation in tensions.  Tensions between the US and North Korea have been mounting in recent weeks, and yesterday Pyongyang issued a series of menacing threats to 'ravage' US troops and 'go to war if they choose'.China warned the region could go to war 'at any moment'. US President Donald Trump is monitoring the emerging crisis from his Mar-a-Lago resort this weekend without the company of his top advisers. North Korean state television showed Kim, wearing a black suit and white shirt, stepping out of a black limousine.He saluted his honor guard before walking down a red carpet to a podium and clapped with senior government officials to address the massive crowd taking part in the parade. Goose-stepping soldiers and marching bands filled the square as tanks, multiple launch rocket systems and other weapons waited to parade.  Kim, a 30-something leader who took power in late 2011, emphasizes nuclear weapons as the foundation of his national defense strategy.The country under his watch has been aggressively pursuing a goal of putting a nuclear warhead on an ICBM capable of reaching the continental United States.     Kim Jong Un is all smiles at Day of the Sun celebrations
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     The U.S. is reportedly prepared to take action if North Korea attacks. On April 15, thousands of North Korean troops armed with rifles took part in the show of force, which saw North Korea flaunt sophisticated new military hardware
     The U.S. is reportedly prepared to take action if North Korea attacks. On April 15, thousands of North Korean troops armed with rifles took part in the show of force, which saw North Korea flaunt sophisticated new military hardware

    North Korea has warned that Donald Trump's 'troublemaking' and 'aggressive' tweets have pushed the world to the brink of thermo-nuclear war
    North Korea has warned that Donald Trump's 'troublemaking' and 'aggressive' tweets have pushed the world to the brink of thermo-nuclear war

    US intelligence sources claim President Donald Trump is prepared to strike if North Korea attacks  
    US intelligence sources claim President Donald Trump is prepared to strike if North Korea attacks  

    U.S. Air Force 44th and 67th Fighter Squadron F-15 Eagles and 961st Airborne Air Control Squadron E-3 Sentries taxi down the runway at the Kadena Air Base 
    U.S. Air Force 44th and 67th Fighter Squadron F-15 Eagles and 961st Airborne Air Control Squadron E-3 Sentries taxi down the runway at the Kadena Air Base 

    Tanks rolled through the capital city of the secretive state, which was marking the 105th birthday of Kim Jong-un's late grandfather
    Tanks rolled through the capital city of the secretive state, which was marking the 105th birthday of Kim Jong-un's late grandfather

    US officials feared Kim Jong-un would mark the national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test, since the country has used previous holidays to showcase its military prowess
    US officials feared Kim Jong-un would mark the national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test, since the country has used previous holidays to showcase its military prowess

    Smiling dictator: Kim Jung-un was noticeably relaxed and appeared happy as he attended the 'Day of the Sun' military parade in Kim Il Sung square - which celebrates his grandfather - the founder of North Korea
    Smiling dictator: Kim Jung-un was noticeably relaxed and appeared happy as he attended the 'Day of the Sun' military parade in Kim Il Sung square - which celebrates his grandfather - the founder of North Korea

    China, North Korea's sole major ally and neighbor which nevertheless opposes its weapons program, on Friday again called for talks to defuse the crisis. Pictured, preparations ahead of the parade
    China, North Korea's sole major ally and neighbor which nevertheless opposes its weapons program, on Friday again called for talks to defuse the crisis. Pictured, preparations ahead of the parade

    America flexes its muscle in South Korea as U.S. Army conducts defense exercises amid growing tensions with North Korea

    US soldiers prepare for a military exercise near the border between South and North Korea on April 15 in Paju, South Korea

    China yesterday again called for talks to defuse the escalation in tensions.Some detachments carried assault rifles or rocket-propelled grenades, others were equipped with night-vision goggles and daubed in face paint. One troupe was made up of sword-wielding women. The nuclear-armed North is under United Nations sanctions over its weapons programmes, and has ambitions to build a rocket capable of delivering a warhead to the US mainland - something Trump has vowed 'won't happen'.

    The display of patriotism came on a day which US experts fear could be used to carry out further missile testing in North Korea
    The display of patriotism came on a day which US experts fear could be used to carry out further missile testing in North Korea

    Soldiers march through Pyongyang as officials look on at the celebration event, a national holiday in North Korea


    Soldiers march through Pyongyang as officials look on at the celebration event, a national holiday in North KoreaCOULD THIS NEW MISSILE NUKE THE US? EXPERT SAYS MYSTERY WEAPON COULD BE A 'GAME CHANGER'North Korea unveiled what appeared to be new intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM) at its Day of the Sun parade, amid increasing fears it is trying to develop a model that could hit the United States.The secretive state showed off two new kinds of ICBM enclosed in canister launchers mounted on the back of transporter erector launcher trucks, or TELs.The larger missile was similar in appearance to the Chinese DF-41, which can fly 9,000 miles. Melissa Hanham, a senior research associate at the US-based Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, California, said: 'However, North Korea has a habit of showing off new concepts in parades before they ever test or launch them. It is still early days for these missile designs.' 

    Crowds cheered as a missile was driven past the stand where North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and other high ranking officials looked on
    Crowds cheered as a missile was driven past the stand where North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and other high ranking officials looked on

    An unidentified rocket is displayed during today's parade, with experts voicing fears that it could have a range of 9,000 miles


    An unidentified rocket is displayed during today's parade, with experts voicing fears that it could have a range of 9,000 milesIf the Korean missiles actually work, and have a similar range to the Chinese missile, they could hit the continental US. But it's very unlikely that North Korea has that technology at this stage.Pyongyang has yet to formally announce it has an operational ICBM, but Chad O'Carroll, managing director of specialist service NK News, said the new rockets could be liquid-fuelled intercontinental ballistic missiles, or an early prototype.These long-range missiles would be 'a big game-changer once it is deployed in service', he said but added there would be a long testing schedule ahead before a trial launch of the missile itself.But liquid-fuel missiles also 'take hours to fuel up and if there is intelligence that they were doing that it would be quite easy to stop it before it was launched', he told AFP.In his annual New Year's address, Kim said North Korea's preparations for an ICBM launch had 'reached the final stage'. Recent satellite imagery suggests the country could conduct another underground nuclear test at any time. Solid fuel ICBMs are a 'much more difficult threat to prevent', O'Carroll said, adding that risk was still "many many years" away.Also on show for the first time was the North's submarine launch ballistic missiles (SLBM).

      Arrival: Military vehicles carrying the KN-11 missile - which can be launched from a submarine - and potentially gives the country a limited nuclear second strike capability 
    Arrival: Military vehicles carrying the KN-11 missile - which can be launched from a submarine - and potentially gives the country a limited nuclear second strike capability 

    The parade was held at a time of heightened tension with the US, 24 hours after China warned war could break out 'at any moment'
    The parade was held at a time of heightened tension with the US, 24 hours after China warned war could break out 'at any moment'Tensions have been mounting in recent weeks, and North Korea has issued several warnings threatening to 'pulverize' US troops and retaliate in response to any military action. Kim Dong-yub, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said the canisters and trucks suggested that the North was developing technology to 'cold launch' ICBMs, ejecting them from the canisters before they ignite. This would allow North Korea to prevent its limited number of ICBM-capable launcher trucks from being damaged during launches and also make the missiles harder to detect after they're fired, he said. Cold launches would also allow the missiles to be fired from silos. Kim said that the North is also likely developing solid-fuel ICBMs, and that some of the rockets paraded inside canisters on Saturday might be prototypes. 

    Thousands of soldiers marched during the parade today, on a day of heightened tensions between North Korea and the US 
    Thousands of soldiers marched during the parade today, on a day of heightened tensions between North Korea and the US 
    Soldiers marched and shouted slogans in a patriotic display to mark the anniversary of Kim Il Sung's birth
    Soldiers marched and shouted slogans in a patriotic display to mark the anniversary of Kim Il Sung's birth
    US officials feared Kim Jong-un would mark the national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test, since the country has used previous holidays to showcase its military prowess
    US officials feared Kim Jong-un would mark the national holiday by launching its sixth nuclear weapons test, since the country has used previous holidays to showcase its military prowess
    Performers play the drums at the parade today, where North Korea gave a show of its military might in Pyongyang
    Performers play the drums at the parade today, where North Korea gave a show of its military might in Pyongyang
    Tensions between the US and North Korea have been mounting in recent weeks, and yesterday Pyongyang issued a series of menacing threats to 'ravage' US troops and 'go to war if they choose'.
    China warned the region could go to war 'at any moment'. US President Donald Trump is monitoring the emerging crisis from his Mar-a-Lago resort this weekend without the company of his top advisers. 
    North Korean state television showed Kim, wearing a black suit and white shirt, stepping out of a black limousine.
    He saluted his honor guard before walking down a red carpet to a podium and clapped with senior government officials to address the massive crowd taking part in the parade. 
    Goose-stepping soldiers and marching bands filled the square as tanks, multiple launch rocket systems and other weapons waited to parade.  
    Kim, a 30-something leader who took power in late 2011, emphasizes nuclear weapons as the foundation of his national defense strategy.

    The country under his watch has been aggressively pursuing a goal of putting a nuclear warhead on an ICBM capable of reaching the continental United States 






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